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The Transcript Press.. Inc.. Deuham. Mass. 



THE 1938 



NORWOOD HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY 
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PUBLISHED IN 1938 



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BY THE SENIOR CLASS OF 







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Editor 
JAMES DONOVAN 



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LEIGHTON THOMPSON 
Principal 





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CHARLES HAYDEN 
Submaster 



RUTH M. GOW 
Dean of Girls 



FOREWORD 

The Editorial Staff presents 
the new Crescent, the Year Book 
of the Class of 1938. We trust 
you will like it. 

THE EDITOR 







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NORWOOD HIGH SCHOOL 



fi j J ITU the publication of litis hook, your 
1/1/ school days as undergraduates in the 
High School are brought to a close. The 
men and women whose pictures appear on the 
opposite page have worked with you and for you 
during those three years which you have spent 
here. It is our sincere, hope that the lessons in 
discipline, conduct and manners, as well as the 
academic work which we have tried to teach may 
stand you in good stead in your adult life. 

May you always be proud of the Norwood High 
School, may your adult life reflect credit upon the 
school and as you read this book in the years to 
come may you look back upon the days which you 
spent here with a deep spirit of satisfaction and 
pleasure. 

Vke faculty 




MEMBERS OF THE FACULTY 



LEIGHTON S. THOMPSON 
CHARLES A. HAYDEN 
GRACE McGONAGLE 
AGNES M. BRIDGES 
FELIX BABEL 
JAMES H. BUTLER 
MARY A. CANNING 
ETHEL H. COOK 
MARY E. COUGHLIN 
JOHN V. DETHIER 
DORIS DEXTER 
IRENE DOYLE 
JAMES A. DUNN 



MARY R. EGAN 
MARGUERITE ELLIOTT 
HENRY FAIRBANKS 
STANLEY FISHER 
M. ELAINE FULTON 
RUTH GODDARD 
JAMES J. GORMLEY 
RUTH M. GOW 
ORRELLE J GRAY 
MARY F. HUBBARD 
ELIZABETH D. JAMES 
RUTH JOHNGREN 
D. VINCENT KENEFICK 



MARGARET KENEFICK 
ERNA H. KILEY 
EVERETT F. LEARNARD 
LOUISE McCORMACK 
MILDRED METCALF 
H. BENNETT MURRAY 
MARGARET NICHOLSON 
ROBERT E. O'NEIL 
ELIZABETH O'SULLIVAN 
ELEANOR PEABODY 
LUCY E. STEELE 
JOHN SULLIVAN 
CLIFFORD WHEELER 



YEAR BOOK STAFF 




EDITORS 



Donald Alden 
Helen Cleary 
James Donovan 
Lucille Fenton 
John Lanzone 
Edmund Mulvehill 
Elizabeth Schroeder 
Veronica Riley 
John Williamson 



FACULTY ADVISOR Henry Fairbanks 




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ELMER PIKE 
Vice-President 




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MARTHA TAYLOR 
Secretary 




CARROLL WOODS 
President 



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FRANCIS QUANN 
A. A. Council 




MILDRED LINDBLOM 
Girls' Treasurer 



JOSEPH BONICA 
Boys' Treasurer 



HISTORY OF THE SENIOR CLASS 



The History of the (lass of '38 differs in three res/teds 
from the preceding histories: first, our class began to be 
really active in the Freshman rather than the Sophomore 
year; second, everything undertaken by the CJass of '38 has 
been a huge success both socially and financially; and third, 
there has been no class in the past, there is no class in the 
present, and there will be no class in the future, that can 
compare with the CJass of '3#. 

During September in the year L934, we of the Class of '38, a group of disunited 
hul high-spirited school children, entered our freshman year of high sehool in 
possession of the harmful knowledge that we were to rule the Junior High Sehool 
during that year. Our first step was to unite the individual rooms for the purpose 
of working toward a common goal. This u as effected by the selection of a class 
pin which was to be worn by the members of the class and which gave us a feeling 
of unity. The class progressed satisfactoril) until we felt that the time was ripe 
for publishing a year book. It was at this time that the Class of '38 met its first 
obstacle, for an epidemic of scarlet fever prohibited issuing the book. This, however, 
failed to break our spirit, and on the rain) evening of February 14th, we held a 
Valentine party which was the first, and incidental^ the last of its nature to be held 
in the Junior High. Our principal during this hectic Freshman year was Mr. Lynch. 

A fine morning in October. 1935, found us trudging in the general direction of 
the Senior High. Don't you remember that school was delayed three weeks in open- 
ing because of an infantile paralysis epidemic? Realizing our inferiority in the 
eyes of the omniscient and venerable Seniors, we swaggered into the institution with 
a chip on our shoulder. The friendliness and geniality of the Seniors, however, had 
a disarming effect, and the end of the day found us confiding in the same Senior's 
upon whom we had looked with distrust but a few hours previous. Mr. Archibald 
and the rest of the faculty did all within their power to insure our confidence in the 
administration of the school: however, it was not until the election of our class 
officers that we reallv settled down. Joe Palleiko was elected President: Lucille 
Fenton, Vice-President: Margaret Costello. Secretarv : Carroll Woods and Marie 
Gray, Treasurers: and Francis Quann was elected to the A. A. Council. 

The Sophomore Party was an event that will always remain in the minds of 
those who attended. Major Adam Scott Bowes conducted his amateur hour coin- 
mendably, for the performance was interrupted only once by the sound of the gong. 
This occurred when Teddy Mulvehill made a sorrowful attempt to croon "Love in 
Bloom. The Sophomore Party was not solely a social success, for we demon- 
strated our financial ability by aiding the coffers of our treasury with the returns 
of the Party. 

The next event of any importance was the Sophomore Play, "White Christmas", 
which was coached by Miss Gray. The characters included Jimmy Donovan, Uuno 
Hallman, Emily Caswell, Wayne Foster, and others. This play was significant in 
that it gave evidence of the superior talent to be exhibited when we were to give our 
Senior Play, two years hence. 

When we returned to school the following autumn, we found that the Juniors 
to whom we had paid little attention were the lords and masters of the school. 
This was the moment for diplomacy, and in a short time we had the Seniors eating 
(»ut of our hands. In anticipation of a lug year, we elected Carroll Woods, Presi- 
dent: Lucille Fenton. Vice-President: Frances Richall, Secretary; Gladys Nord- 
strom and Gertrude Mason, Treasurers: and Francis Quann, A. A. Council. During 
this memorable >ear on the Hill, we walked awa\ with Scholastic honors, showing 
the Seniors that they had something with which to contend. The most important 



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event of our social calendar, however, was ihe Junior Prom. It was during this 
affair that we of the Class of '38 appeared in the limelight in which we were destined 
to remain for the rest of our career on the Hill. It is unnecessary to state that the 
Prom was both a social and financial success because everything that the class of 
'38 undertook from this point on was considered a success even before it was held. 

In September, 1937, the Class of "38 came into its own at the Norwood Senior 
High. This was the year in which we really made our mark among all those classes 
that had gone before. We started the year by holding the annual election: however, 
the difference of opinions became so intense that the Senior Class divided into two 
factions. There was a serious issue at stake, for the question of whether we were 
to have a student congress was to be voted upon by the entire school. The result 
of the election was that Carroll Woods was elected President: Elmer Pike. Vice- 
President: Martha Taylor, Secretary; Mildred Lindbloom and Joseph Bonica. Treas- 
urers; Francis Quann, A. A. Council. 

The next important event was the Football Dance which was sponsored by the 
Senior Class. The Gymnasium was a riot of color when the decorations were 
finished by the committee, and the huge attendance made their work worthwhile. 
The music was furnished by Harold Kiley. and the main attraction was the presenta- 
tion of the football coaches, the captains, and the cheer leaders of both Norwood 
and Dedham. The coaches of both schools gave their opinions as to the outcome of 
the game, followed by Co-captains Quann and Bader of Norwood. Chisholm and 
Avery of Dedham. Those in attendance at the dance were asked to cheer both schools 
led first by the Dedham cheerleaders, and then by those of Norwood. The dance was 
a tremendous success, both socially and financially, and was said to be the most 
gala dance ever held at the High School. 

It seemed as though our Christmas vacation had just ended when we were 
informed that the Senior Play was about to be produced. The play chosen was 
"Life Begins At Sixteen," which seemed very appropriate for the purpose, for no 
doubt Miss Gray had a certain class in mind when she chose this play. The charac- 
ters in the play were Russell Spachman, Uuno Hallman. Mary Breen. Philip Pen- 
dergast, Irene Palonen, Barbara Rathburn. Helen Pendergast. Edward Paolucci, 
Alma Spearwater, Marion Henry, Toivo Suomi, Margaret Costello. Marjorie Bemis. 
Raymond O'Brien and Rita Tarpey. The play was most successful, evidenced by 
the fact that the Class of '38 realized financially more than twice as much as any 
other class in the history of the school. 

In the meantime, we had decided to wear blue caps and gowns for graduation. 
(Tommy Conroy and Ray O'Brien ought to know. I 

By this time the yearbook of the Class of '38 was progressing rapidly under 
ihe careful eye of the Editor-in-Chief. Jinum Donovan. Inlike main of the other 
classes, we made sure of getting an early start, thanks to the suggestion of our 
tireless adviser. Mr. Fairbanks, to whom we owe a debt of gratitude. Even with this 
advantage, the work seemed to pile up on those connected with the best vearbook 
that has ever been seen at the High School. 

As this goes to press, the Senior Prom, an event of the future, is destined to be- 
another great success even though the treasury of the Class of '38 has no urgent 
need of the profit. 

Thus we terminate twelve of the best years of our life, years that we have 
happily spent in delving for knowledge in the companionship of many of our best 
friends. We are happy, however, for we have made our mark among the classes of 
Norwood High. We will not consider this an ending, but we will think of it as 
the starting point from which students of the class of '38 shall begin their careers. 
And we shall always remember the friends that we have made and the unforgettable 
experiences that we have had under the careful but friendly supervision of our 
teachers in the school that has meant so much to our predecessors, and will mean so 
much to us, the Class of '38. 

IRVING BERKLAND 
Historian of the Class of 1938 



NAIMI BADER 

"Nitme" 
34 Sturtevant Ave. Undecided 

"You've Got To Be A Football Hero" 
Football 1, 2, 3; Co-captain 3; Baseball 1, 2, 3; Basket- 
ball 1, 2, 3; Traffic Squad; Quest Club. — Ping Pone: 










DONALD DRAKE ALDEN 

"Don" 
250 Prospect St. Worcester Polytechnic Institute 

"You Started Something" 
Indoor Track 1, 2, 3; Outdoor Track 1, 2, 3; Quest 
Club; Traffic Squad; Judge of Traffic Court; Year Book 
Staff. — Photography 



GEORGE A. BAILEY 

"Jeep" 
97 Walnut Ave. Work 

"Oh, Say Can You Swing" 
Quest Club — Playing the piano 



CHESTER AMBRUSKEVICH 

"Greeny" 
8 Talbot Ave. Barber School 

"The Morning After" 
Quest Club. —Pool 



ELOISE ELIZABETH BAKER 

"Giggles" 
14 Capel St. Business School 

"Smile, Darn You Smile" 
Quest Club; Basketball. — Bicycle Riding 



STEPHANIE AUKSTOLIS 

7 Chapel St. Chandler Secretarial School 

"An OH Flame Never Dies" 
Quest Club; Home Room Representative 3; Senior Ad- 
visor; Basketball 1, 2, 3; Varsity Captain; Tennis 1; 
Traffic Squad. — Bicycle Riding 



HELEN MARY BANKS 

264 Nahatan St. College 

"Now Or Never" 
Quest Club; Virgil Club; Debating Club 1; Usher at 
Senior Prom. — Collecting small foreign dolls 



JOSEPHINE MARY BABEL 

"Jo" 
31 Folan Ave. Undecided 

"Did You Mean It" 
Basketball; Quest Club. — Stamp collecting 



TERENCE L. BARRETT 

"Terry" 
406 Prospect Ave. Undecided 

"Chirp O Little Ditty" 
Football 1, 2, 3; Quest Club. —Cars 



JULIA BERNADETTE BABEL 

"Julie" 
31 Folan Ave. Undecided 

"Trust In Me" 
Basketball 1, 2, '3; Quest Club; Senior Advisor; Reading, 









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CHARLES ANTHONY BARTKEWICZ 

"Chooky" 
22 Dean St. 

"And I In Another World" 
Football 3; Baseball Manager 3. 



Work 



IRVING THEODORE BERKLAND 

"Sheik" 
44 Cedar St. Northeastern 

He's Tall, He's Tan, He's Terrific" 
Quest Club; Football 2; Traffic Squad; Baseball 1; Rifle 
Club 2, 3; President 2, 3; High School Representative to 
Free Press. — Journalism 



HELEN ESTHER BARTULEVICK 

"Curey" 
1062 Washington St. Work 

"bloating On A Bubble" 
Invitation Committee 2; Quest Club. 

— Crocheting 



13 Saunders Rd. 



ALEXANDER EDWARD BLAZIS 

"Alec" 
Undecided 
'Foolin' Myself" 

— Aviation 




LEO BAZZY 

"Baz" 

26 Walnut Ave. Northeastern 

"Smarty" 

Quest Club; Outdoor Track 3; Football 1, 2; Traffic 

Squad; Stage Manager of Senior Play. — Radio 



EDWINA RACHEL BOCHANOWICZ 

"Eddie" 
14 Hartford Rd. Wilfred Academy of Hairdressing 

"Paradise In Waltz Time" 
Quest Club; Glee Club; Tennis; Archery. 

— Dancing 



ANGELA M BENEDETTI 

"Ang" 
79 Austin St. Work 

"Carefree" 
Basketball; Quest Club; Usher at Graduation. 

— Dancing 



125 Cottage St. 



JOSEPH STEPHAN BONICA 

"Joe" 
Northeastern 
"Good And Lucky" 
Quest Club; Class Treasurer 3; Traffic Officer; Football 
1; Track 1; Ticket Committee of Senior Play; Checking 
Committee Junior Prom. — Hunting 



Northeastern 



J. BERNARD CLINTON BERGMAN 

"Swede" 
71 Munroe St. 

"Big Chief String It" 
Captain of Traffic Squad; Basketball 1; Quest Club; 
Home Room Representative 1, 2; Production Manager, 
Senior Play. — Dancing 



ROBERT FRANCIS BOTHWELL 

"Bob" 
909 Washington St. Navy 

"Bob White" 
Football 2, 3; Track 2. —Mechanic 




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GEORGE FRANCIS BUTLER 

26 North Ave. Undecided 

"Under Your Spell" 
Quest Club; Traffic Squad. — Sleeping 



DAVID ARNOLD BOYDEN 

"Sarge" 
55 Elliot St. Undecided 

"An My Eggs In One Basket (ball)" 
Traffic Squad; Quest Club; Basketball 2, 3; Baseball. 

— Basketball 



MARGARET ANNE BYRNE 

10 Garfield Ave. Business School 

"At Your Service" 
Debating Club; Quest Club; Basketball 1. 



JOHN PAUL BREEN 

"Beano" 
417 Nahatan St. Boston University 

"Remember Me?" 
Traffic Squad; Football 1, 2; Baseball 1, 2, 3. 

— Mechanics 



MARGARET AGNES CAMPBELL 

"Peggy" 
43 Adams St. 

"Sweet Thing" 
Traffic Squad; Quest Club; Tennis; Junior Prom Com- 
mittee; P'ootball Dance Committee. — Tennis 



MARY CONSTANCE BREEN 

198 Prospect St. Katharine Gibbs School 

"Love And Learn" 
Quest Club; Dramatic Club; Glee Club; Senior Advisor; 
Senior Play; Usher at Junior Prom. 

— Horseback Riding 



FRED VICTOR CARLSON 

352 Washington St. Work 

"Mr. Ghost Goes To Town" 

— Card Playing 



ROBERT D. BREEN 

"Bob" 
417 Nahatan St. 

"There's a Lull In My Life" 
Quest Club; Football 3; Track 1, 2. 



Undecided 



LEONE CHRISTINE ELEANOR CARLSON 

"Lee" 
43 Prospect Ave. Work 

"All Quiet On The Old Porch Tonight" 
Dramatic Club 2; Sophcmore Play; Quest Club. 

— Reading, Dancing 



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EDITH MARIE BRIERLEY 

"Shrimp" 
80 Cross St. 

"Cling To Me" 
Quest Club. — Collecting Photographs 



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ELINOR MARGUERITE CHUBET 

"Chickie" 
13 St. John Ave. Newton Hospital 

"In Your Own Quiet Way" 
Quest Club Governing: Board; Glee Club; Hobby Club; 
Usher for Senior Play; Football Dance Committee. 

— Knitting, Dancing 

JOSEPH ANTHONY CONROY 

"Joe" 
98 Railroad Ave. Undecided 

"Red Heads On Parade" 
Traffic Squad; Track 2, 3; Quest Club. -Aviation 



GORA CIANCARELLI 

1150 Washington St. Work 

"A Treat For The Eyes" 
Quest Club; Traffic Squad; Senior Adviser. 

— Reading, Movies 



THOMAS STEPHEN CONROY 

"Slink" 
280 Railroad Ave. Boston College 

You Can't PuH The Wool Over My Eyes" 
Quest Club; Baseball 2, 3; Football 1, 3; Four years 
first year Latin. — Sleeping in Class 



HELEN LOUISE CLEARY 

"Shorty" 
12 West St. Massachusetts General Hospital 

"Sweet Is The Word For You" 
Orchestra 1, 2, 3; Home Representative 3; Dramatic 
Club 2; Traffic Squad; Quest Club; Year Book Staff; 
Senior Advisor; A. A. Representative. — Swimming 



LAURA MARY CORMIER 

"Bib" 
25 North Ave. Undecided 

"A Fine Romance" 
Senior Advisor; Quest Club; Tennis 2; Football Dance 
Committee. — Tennis, Collecting Dolls 

BEATRICE MONROE COLEMAN 

"Bee" 
42 Rosemary St. Wellesley 

"A Little B't Independant" 
Quest Club; Senior Advisor; Traffic Squad; Usher at 
1937 Graduation; Virgil Club 3; Executive Board of Traf- 
fic Squad; Junior Prom Committee. — Boating 

IRENE ELIZABETH COSTELLO 

"Scrumpv" 
49 Hoyle St. College 

"When Did You Leave Heaven" 
Traffic Squad; Senior Adviser; Quest Club; Executive 
Board of Traffic Squad; Virgil Club 3; Football Dance 
Committee; Junior Prom Committee; Usher at 1937 
Graduati n; Clerk of Student Court; A. A. Association. 

— Boating, Skating 

JAMES E. CONNOLLY 

"Schlitz" 
14 Myrtle St. Army 

"I Wanna Be In WinchelVs Column" 

— Traveling 

MARGARET CLAIRE COSTELLO 

"Marge" 
96 Railroad Ave. Nursing 

"There's No Substitute For You" 
Class Secretary 1; Senior Play; Quest Club; Senior Year 
Book Committee; Junior Prom Committee; Football Dance 
Committee. — Dancing 




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MARY ELIZABETH CURRAN 

"Currie" 
88 Railrcad Ave. Bjston University 

"All Dressed Up And No Place To Go" 
Quest Club; Junior Prom Committee; Football Dance 
Committee; Year Book Committee. -Sports 



MARGARET JOSEPHINE COSTELLO 

"Babe" 
15 Adam St. Work 

"Love Will Tell" 
Quest Club; Football Dance Committee. -Tennis 



MARY JOSEPHINE CURRAN 

"Jaysie" 
51 Hill St. Business School 

"Where Are You" 
Quest Club 3: Dramatic Club 1; Fooibill Dance Com- 
mittee; Class Day Refreshment Committee. 

— Reading 

WILLIAM JOSEPH COUGHLIN, JR. 

"Billy" 
£51 Pleasant St. Prep School 

"Playboy Of Paree" 
Outdoor Track 1, 2, 3; Tennis 1, 2, 3; Quest Club; 
Fcotball 1; Indoor Track 1, 2, 3. —Sports 



CLARA M. DALTON 

415 Prospect St. Stoneleigh College 

"The Lady From Fifth Avenue" 
Quest Ch.b; Year Bot,k; Football Dance Committee; A. A. 
Associate; Junior Prom Committee; Senior Play Com- 
mittee. — Boating 

DAVID JOHN CURRAN 

"Slave" 
253 Railroad Ave. School 

"Walkcng My Baby Back Home" 
Quest Club; Tennis 2, 3; Hobby Club 2. 

— Stamp Collecting 

MARGARET F. DAUNT 

"Peggy" 
2'3 Railroad Ave. Undecided 

•'I've Got A Pocketful Of Sunshine" 
Basketball 1, 2, 3; Tennis 1, 2, 3; Quest Club Governing- 
Board 1, 2; Cheerleader; Traffic Squad; Dramatic Club; 
Senior Adviser Senior Play Committee; Football Dance 
Committee. — Dancing 





JOHN E. CURRAN 

"Iggy" 

27 Pine St. University of Southern California 

"The Moon Is Graining At Me' 
Quest Club. — Fishing 



MILLICENT C. DE COSTA 

"Milly" 
41 Press Ave. Undecided 

"Until The Real Thing Comes Alonp" 
Quest Club. —Roller Skating 



MARTHA LOUISE CURRAN 

"Martna" 
26 Lincoln St. College 

"Sugar Plum" 
Traffic Squad; Quest Club; Dramatic Club 2, 3; Ex- 
ecutive Board of Dramatic Club 2; Secretary of Dramatic 
Club 3; Junior Prom Committee; Football Dance Com- 
mittee. — Tennis 






DOROTHY MATILDA DEEB 

"Dotty" 
112 Ceder St. 

"Will You" 

Decoration C mmittee of Football Dance; Quest Club. 

— Stamp Collection 



Burdett College 



RITA ELAYNE DONAHUE 

17 Pine St. Undecided 

"We Can Huddle At Horn"" 
Quest Club; Senior Advisor; Lunch Counter; Junior 
Prom Committee. — Swimming 




SALLY R. DEEB 

"Sal" 
82 Chapel St. 

Quest Club. 



Wilfred Academy 
"Follow Your Heart" 

— Interior Decorating 







JAMES RICHARD DONOVAN 

"Josher" 
33 Granite St. Notre Dame 

"All's Fair In Love And War" 
Tennis 1, 2, 3; Quest Club Treasurer 3; Editor-in-Chief 
of Year Bo k; Debating Club 1, 2, 3, President 3; Traf- 
fic Squad; Orchestra 1, 2; Dramatic Club 2; Baseball 4; 
Sophomore Play 2. — Tennis 



JOHN W. D'ESPINOSA 

"Despa" 
2 Atwood Ave. United States Navy 

"Fasy To Love" 
Baseball 3; Traffic Squad. — Sports 



JOHN P. DONOVAN 

"Dunker" 
92 Walpole St. Holy Cross 

You'' re. Gonna Wake Up Some Day" 
Football 1, 2; Basketball 2, 3; Baseball 1, 2, 3; Home- 
room Representative 1, 2, 3; Quest Club; Quest Club 
Representative 1. — Art 



HELEN FRANCES DI MARZIO 

"Hey" 
26 St. George Ave. Undecided 

"If I Had Known" (You) 
Quest Club; Basketball 1, 2. — Dancing 



JOHN THOMAS DOWER 

"Long John" 
11 Summit Ave. Bently 

"Hotv Could You" (Come on give the girls a break) 
Basketball 1; Rifle Club 2, 3; Quest Club; Home Room 
Representative 2; Traffic Squad; Year Book Committee. 

— Model Building 



EDWARD H. DOHERTY 

"Squash" 
85 Hill St. Undecided 

"Laugh Your Way Through Life" 
Rifle Club 1. —Hunting 



HELEN TERESA DRUMMEY 

"Smily" 
166 Pleasant St. Secretarial School 

"Broadway Cinderella" 
Tennis; Quest Club; Usher for 1937 Graduation. 

— Dancing 



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SAMERA EYSIE 

"Sammy" 
23 Concord Ave. Secretarial School 

"Does Your Heart Beat For Me" 
Senior Adviser; Quest Club 1, 2, 3; Usher for Senior 
Play. — Reading 




CONSTANCE ANN DUFFEY 

"Connie" 
31 Hoyle St. Chandler's Secretarial School 

"Someone To Care For Me" 
Usher for Senior Play; Dramatic 1; Tennis; Quest Club; 
Athletic Association. — Riding 

LUCILLE FENTON 

"Suela" 
149 Walpole St. Massachusetts School of Art 

"Lulu's Back In Town" 
Class Vice-President 1, 2; Basketball 1, 2, 3; Tennis 1, 
3; Traffic Squad Clerk; Quest Club; Year Book Staff; 
Cheerleader; Swimming Team; Chairman of Senior Ad- 
visors; Dramatic Club 1, 2, 3, (Secretary 1, Executive 
Board 2). — Sketching 

JULIA GERTRUDE DUNDULIS 

"Julie" 
1120 Washington St. Wilfred's Academy 

"Take My Heart" 
Senior Advisor; Quest Club. — Dancing 



PATRICK LEO FLAHERTY 

"Pat" 
Lydon St. Military Service 

"I'm Like A Fish Out Of Water" 
Quest Club; Rifle Club. — Photography 




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PHILIP BERNARD EKHOLM 

"Phiddie" 

47 Phillips Ave. Undecided 

"The Gentleman Obviously Doesn't Believe In Love" 
Basketball 1, 2, 3; Baseball 2, 3; Traffic Squad; Quest 

Club. —Basketball 



THOMAS JOSEPH FLOOD 

"Tom" 
67 Highland St. Business School 

"I'd Love To Plan A Love Scene" 
Quest Club; Traffic Squad; Stage Committee for Senior 
Play. — Dancing 

INGRID MARGARET EKLOF 

"Inkie" 
54 Chapel St. Chandler Secretarial School 

"You're A Peach" 
Quest Club; Traffic Squad; Tennis; Debating Club; 
Tcket and Property Committees for Senior Play; Decora- 
tion Committee, Football Dance. — Drawing 

JOHN PAUL FOLEY 

"Smush" 
24 Lydon St. Business School 

"Swing High, Swing Loir" 
Home Room Representative 3; Football 2, 3; Golf 2, 3, 
Captain 3; Dramatic Club 1; Quest Club; Year Book Gen- 
eral Committee; Checking Committee Senior Play. 

—Golf 






GEORGE ELIAS 

"Chuck" 
1151 Washington St. Grocery Business 

"One In A Million" (Honest) 
Football 1, 2, 3; Baseball 1; Quest Club; Basketball. 

—Pool 



ARTHUR CHANNING FOSS, JR. 

"Fossy" 
81 Winslow Ave. Work and Night School 

"Tea For Two" 
Quest Club. — Swimming 





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SYLVIA ELEEN GLEICHAUF 

"Sis" 
26 Oak Rd. Business School 

"Am I In Love" 
Dramatic Club 1; Orchestra 1, 2, 3; Quest Club. 

— Bowling 



HILDA ROSEMARY FRANK 

"Frankie" 
160 Washington St., Hyde Park Gordon College 

"It Can Happen To You" 
Quest Club; Debating Club; Astronomy Club - Hcbby 
Club. — Block Printing 



MARIE ELIZABETH GRAY 

"McGee" 
12 Oak Rd. Business School 

"You Couldn't Be Cuter" 
Class Treasurer 1; Dramatic Club 1, 2; Quest Club; 
Home Rom Representative 2; A. A. Representative 3; 
Class Gifts for Year Book; Usher for Senior Play; Gen- 
eral Committee for Year Book. 

— Collecting small toy animals 



MARION LUELLA GALLAGHER 

"Mannie" 
165 Walnut Ave. Massachusetts State College 

"Sophisticated Lady" 
Quest Club; Chairman of Property Committee for 
Senior Play; Home Room Representative for Quest Club 1. 

— Cooking 



BROWNIE D. GREEN 

"Major" 
118 Summer St. Work 

"Getting Some Fun Out Of Life" 
Quest Club; Manager of Track Team 3. — Hunting 



PETRES THEODORA GEORGEU 

"Pete" 
212 Lenox St. Work 

"It Ain't Right" 
Quest Club; Glee Club; Basketball; Senior Play Com- 
mittee. — Reading 



UUNO HALLMAN 

65 Trem nt St. Undecided 

"Niee Work If You Can Get It" (Acting) 
Senior Play; Dramatic Club 1, 2, 3; Quest Club 1, 2, 3. 

— Tennis 



HELEN REGIS GLANCY 

117 Walnut Ave. Boston University 

"I'd Rather Lead A Band" 
Quest Club; Orchestra 1, 2, 3; Band 2, 3. 

— Drum Major 



FRANCIS MARY HANLEY 

"Frannie" 
146 Winslow Ave. Wilfred Academy 

"The Traffic Was Terrific" 
Quest Club; Usher at Graduation; Publicity Committee, 
Junior Prom; Advertising Committee. — -Tatting 







PRISCILLA RACHEL HOLMAN 

"Pris" 

8 Belmont St. Wilfred Academy 

"The Life Of The Party" 
Quest Club; Basketball; Dramatic Club; Tennis; Swim- 
ming; Sophomore Committee; Junior Prom Usher; Foot- 
ball Dance Committee; Senior Play Committee; Class 
Gift Committee. — Basketball 



ROY H. HANSEN 

25 Hoyle St. Undecided 

"With Plenty Of Money And Yon" 
Tennis 2; Football Manager; Quest Club; Year Book 
Committee. 



HOWARD M. HORTON 

"Lefty" 
774 Neponset St. University of California 

"Slumming On Pork Avenue." 
Quest Club. — Hunting 



MTCE EDNA HARTSHORN 

130 Munroe St. Work 

"That's The Least Yon Can Do For A Lady" 

— Stamp Collecting 



HEIMO ROBERT HYORA 

16 Fifth St. Northeastern Univ r. ity 

"If I Had A Talking Picture Of You" 
Rifle Club; Track; Traffic Squad; Quest Club. 

— Running 



LAWRENCE TRAVIS HAYES 

"Larry" 
431 Prospect St. School 

"I Never Had A Chanc" 
Rifle Club; Quest Club; Orchestra; Track; Dramatic 
Club; Senior Play Committee. — Collecting 



THEODORE HYORA 

"Devo" 
16 Fifth St. Slippery Rock 

"Satan 7Vfr*<? A Holiday" 
Quest Club; Baseball; Rifle Club; Track; Football. 

— Driving 



MARTON CLAIRE HENRY 

"Bucky" 
52 Prospect Ave. Dramatic School 

"I'd Rather Listen To Those Eyes" 
Dramatic Club; Quest Club; Glee Club; Tennis; A. A. 
Representative; Senior Play. — Swimming 



DAVID HYYTI. 2ND 

"Heidi" 
54 Savin Ave. Slipperv Rock 

"Who's Afraid Of The Big Bad Wolf" 
Quest Club; Track. — Music 



RICHARD EMMET HOLLISTER 

"Dick" 
15 Crescent Ave. Northeastern University 

"Whistle While You Work" 
Senior Play Committee; Track; Quest Club; Football; 
Rifle Club; Dramatic Club. — Swimming 






AVARD SARRE JOHNSON 

"Snarze" 
38 West St. 

"Sweet Someone" 
Quest Club; Football; Track; Baseball; Basketball. 

— Driving 



Slippery Rock 




246 Railroad Ave. 



JAMES KEADY 

"Jimmy" 

Work 



"A Bicycle Built For Two" 
Traffic Squad 3; Quest Club. 



-Tennis 



BERGER E. JOHNSON 

33 Cross St. Work as a Cabinet Maker 

"Lost In My Dreams" 
Quest Club. — Wood Carving 



MARGARET H. KEADY 

"Peggy" 
35 Mountain Ave. Undecided 

"You Gotta Smile To Be Happy" 
Basketball 1, 2, 3; Quest Club. — Swimming 




RUSSELL JOHNSON 

"Fat" 
29 Saunders Rd. Undecided 

"Some Day We'll Meet Again" 
Rifle Club; Quest Club. 



262 Lenox St. 
Quest Club. 



MARGARET KEELER 

•Marty" 

Burdett 



"Chirp A Little Ditty" 



-Singing 



STELLA A. JUSKIEWICZ 

"Jazz" 

17 Folan Ave. Work 

"I'll Sit Right Doivn And Write Myself A Letter" 
Glee Club 2; Basketball 3; Swimming 1; Quest Club 3; 

Senior Advisor. — Dancing 



JOHN F. KELLY 

"Kel" 
395 Nahatan St. Boston College 

"Me, Myself And I" 
Football 1, 2, 3; Indoor Track 3; Outdoor Track 3; 
Quest Club Executive Board 3; Home Room Representa- 
tive 3. — Dancing 



BERTHA KALLIEL 

"Bert" 
13 Tremont St. Undecided 

"Blame It On The Rhumba" 
Quest Club; Basketball 1, 3; Usher at Senior Play. 

— Aviation 




79 Howard St. 



LILLIAN C. KING 

Nursing 
"You Appeal To Me" 
Traffic Squad; Quest Club; Senior Advisor; Usher at 
Junior Prom. — Ice Skating 









- > 





^WA v^"* 




f k 



JOHN J. LANZONI 

174 Neponset St. Undecided 

"It's The Gypsy In Me" 
Quest Club Governing Board 2; Corresponding Secretary 
3; Year Book Staff; A. A. Representative; Football 1, 2, 
3; Indoor Track 1, 2, 3; Outdoor Track 1, 2, 3. 

— Ping Pong 



MARJORIE C. KOCH 

"Margie" 
8 Endicott St. Business School 

"When You Gotta Sing, You Gotta Sing" 
Quest Club. — Stamp Collector 



MILDRED LINDBLOM 

"Mil" 
16 Oak Rd. Goddard Junior College 

"You're So Darn Charming" 
Quest Club; Traffic Squad; Girls' Treasurer 3; Senior 
.Advisor; Junior Prom Committee; Football Dance Com- 
mittee; Head Usher at Senior Play; Year Book Individual 
Writeup Committee. — Music 



KARIN A. KORHONEN 

"Leo" 
25 Savin Ave. Undecided 

"/ Could Be In Heaven" 
Quest Club. — Stamp Collecting 



MARTIN J. LYDON 

"Junior" 
188 Prospect St. Southern California 

"The Morning After" 
Home Room Representative 1. 2; Quest Club. 

— Fishing 



VINCENT KUDIRKA 

"Vin" 
37 Franklin St. Burdett 

"Tormented" 
Quest Club; Traffic Sauad; Rifle Club; Track 2, 3. 

— Fishing 



MARGARET JOAN LYONS 

"Marge" 
315 Railroad Ave. Business School 

"What A Wonderful World" 
Quest Club; Football Dance Committee; Junior Prom 
Committee. — Tennis 



SALME A. KUUSELA 

"Sally" 
8 Savin Ave. Undecided 

"The Day I Let You Get Aivay" 
Quest Club, Clee Club, Debating Club, Archery. 

— Sketching 



FRANCIS VINCENT MACAULAY 

"Mack" 
273 Railroad Ave. Boston College 

"/ Was Doing All Right" 
Traffic Squad; Baseball; Quest Club. — Fishing 



AUGUSTUS J. LANIER 

"Gus" 
907 Washington St. Undecided 

"Everyday's A Holiday" 
Quest Club; Treasurer of Rifle Club. 

— Collecting china dogs 








A^rfe. 




MARION MACKENZIE 

"Muzzy" 
392 Walpole St. Massachusetts School of Art 

"You Can Count On Me" 
Tennis 1; Quest Club; Orchestra; Junior Prom Com- 
mittee. — Art 





JEAN MARTIN 

"Gene" 
281 Winter St. Colby Junior College 

"You've Got What It Takes" 
Traffic Squad, Quest Club; Junior Prom Committee; 
Football Dance Committee. — Swimming 



MARY C. MAGNANI 

"Shorty" 
82 Austin St. Undecided 

"Dark Eyes" 
Sophomore Play; Dramatic Club; Quest Club: Traffic 
Squad; Senior Advisor. — Dancing 



ARLINE JUDITH MASINO 

"Nevada" 
10 Park St. Massachusetts School of Art 

I've Hitched My Wagon To A Star" 
Quest Club; Tennis 2; Junior Prom Committee; Foot- 
ball Dance Committee. — Drawing 



GRACE CHRISTINE MAGNUSON 

"Gracie" 
23 Melville Ave. Work 

"I'm Feeling Like A Million" 
Quest Club; Tennis. — Sketching 



GERTRUDE A. MASON 

"Trudi" 
144 Winslow Ave. Forsythe Dental School 

"From The Sidewalks Of New York" 
Treasurer 2; Dramatic Club; Traffic Squad; Quest 
Club; Junior Prom Committee; Football Dance Commit- 
tee; Senior Play Committee. — Dramatics 



ADELE NELLIE MAINONES 

"Del" 
558 Pleasant St. Undecided 

'Please Pardon Me, I'm In Love" 
Basketball 1, 2, 3. —Basketball 



HAROLD MATTSON 

"Nooky" 
17 West St. Undecided 

"Join The Parti/" 
Traffic Squad; Football 1, 2, 3; Quest Club. 

—Gambler (Penny Ante) 



MARY H. MARONEY 

11 Hillside 4ve. Undecided 

"The Postman Passes My Door" 

Quest Club. —Baseball 



MARY AGNES MC DONALD 

"Mac" 
139 Dean St. Undecided 

"Old McDonald Had A Farm 
Voice Training. — Music 





i - 




ll 




/ 












MARY MILLS 

58 St. James Ave. Wilfred Academy 

"My Sweet" 
Basketball; Quest Club; Junior Prom Committee. 

— Dancing 



MARGARET MARY MC DONAGH 

"Peggy" 
504 Nahatan St. Undecided 

"Did Your Mother Come From Ireland" 
Quest Club 1, 2, 3; Glee Club; Orchestra 2; Senior 
P'ay Committee; Football Dance Committee; Arguenot 
Dance Committee. — Music 



ROCCO MICHAEL MOLINAR1 

"Rocky" 
40 Sturtevant Ave. Work 

"The Kid In The Three Cornered Pants" 
Basketball 1, 2, 3; Baseball 1; Quest Club; Traffic Squad. 

—Basketball 



ANASTASIA M. MC DONOUGH 

"Tiny" 
28 North Ave. Katherine Gibbs Secretarial School 

"Foolin Myself" 
Quest Club; Dramatic; Senior Play Committee. 

— Tennis 




23 Cottage St. 



EDMUND W. MULVEHILL 

"Ted" 
Holy Cross 
"The Same Old Line" 
Dramatic Club; Year Book Staff; Quest Club; Home- 
room Representative; Class Will; Arguenot Dance Com- 
mittee; Football Dance Committee. — Pool 



RAYMOND MARTIN MC KALE 

"Budda" 
79 Walnut Ave. Work 

"That's Life I Guess" 
Baseball 1, 2, 3; Quest Club. —Coins 



DENNIS JOSEPH MURPHY 

"Deacon Dan" 
714 Pleasant St. Southern California 

"Ridin' High" 
Quest Club; Football 1; Orchestra 1, 2, 3. 

— Stamp Collecting 



CLIFFORD JOSEPH MC LATCHEY 

"Mack" 
693 Pleasant St. Southern California 

"Dream Tim," (In Study Hall) 
Orchestra; Quest Club. — Airplane Modeling 



E. LEO MURPHY 

"Wolf" 
714 Pleasant St. Yale 

"Pick Yourself Up" 
Quest Club; Football 1; Track 3; Senior Play Commit- 
tee; Arguenot Dance Committee. — Stamp Collecting 



MICHAEL PHILIP MIKE 

"Mike" 
7 Atwood Ave. Work 

"One Never Knows, Does One" 
Baseball 1, 2, 3; Quest Club; Senior Play Committee. 

— Traveling 








JAMES M. MURPHY 
"Murph" 

877 Washington St. U. S. Navy 

''How Do I Rote With You" 
Football; Track; Traffic Squad; Quest Club; Dramatic 
Club; A. A. Council. — Reading 



CAROLINE ANN NOTARANGELO 

"Lena" 
27 Cedar St. Work 

"I Wish I Was Aladdin" 
Quest Club; Hobby Club. —Tatting 



PRISCILLA BEATRICE NELSON 
"Scilla" 

30 Lincoln St. Nurses' Training 

"The One Rose" 
Quest Club; Football Dance Committee; Senior Play 
Committee. — Swimming 



RALPH HARVEY NUTTER 

"Harve" 
64 Elm St. Oberlin College 

"On Your Toes" 
Track 1, 2, Captain 3; Football 1; Junior Rotarian; 
Quest Club; Traffic Squad. —Marbles 



BARBARA GOULD NICHOLS 

"Babs" 
3 Douglass Ave. Colby College 

"Get Out And Get Under The Moon" 
Quest Club; Traffic Squad; Tennis; Entertained at 
Sophomore Party. — Music 



MARY ANN O'BRIEN 

"Sis" 
15 Allen Rd. Work 

"Here's Love In Your Eye" 
Quest Club. — Collecting dog pins 




< 




GLADYS MAE NORDSTROM 

"Glad" 
116 Wilson St. Undecided 

"Fm All Tangled Up In Love" 
Traffic Squad; Class Treasurer; Swimming; Quest 
Club. — Knitting 



MARY FRANCES O'BRIEN 

"Daisy Mae" 
120 Pleasant St. Undecided 

"Fancy Meeting You" 
Quest Club; Photography Club. — Bicycle Riding 



MARY PATRICIA NORTON 

"Ginger" 
72 Prospect Ave. Undecided 

"I'd Rather Be Right" 
Quest Club; Voice Training. — Ice Skating 



MICHAEL JOHN O'BRIEN 

"Ginty" 
15 Allan Rd. Burdett 

"Poor Johnny One Note" 
Quest Club; Photography Club. — Fishing 





JOSEPH ANTHONY O'LOUGHLIN 

"Bud" 
101 Hill St. Undecided 

"I'll Smile Again" 
Football 1, 2; Track 2; Quest Club. —Baseball 



RAYMOND FREDERICK O'BRIEN 

"Beans" 
10 First St. Undecided 

"I'se A Muggin" 
Football 1, 2, 3; Track; Senior Class Gift Committee; 
Senior Play. — Billiards 



JOHN EDWARD O'MALLEY 

"Ed" 
Cross St. Work 

"Color Of Your Eyes" 
Quest Club. — Bowling 



FREDERICK VINCENT O'DEA 

1393 Washington St. Business School 

"Stop! You're Breakin' My Heart" 
Traffic Squad; Quest Club; Football 1, 2. — Reading 



THOMAS STEPHEN O'TOOLE 

"Terry" 
28 Cedar St. Undecided 

You're Lookin' For Romance?" 
Quest Club. — Traveling 



JAMES E. O'DONNELL 

"O'Dee" 

67 Nichols St. Undecided 

"Mohia, I Wanna Make Rhythm' 
Football 1, 2, 3; Indor Track 1, 2, 3; Outdoor Track 1, 
2, 3; Basketball 1, 2. —Pocket Billiards 



REGINA J. OSIPOVICH 

"Reggie" 
1214 Washington St. Undecided 

"Sing, Baby, Sing" 
Basketball; Quest Club; Glee Club. — Reading 



RUTH MILDRED OEN 

"Rudy" 
473 Pleasant St. Exploring 

"Am I Asking Too Much" 
Basketball 2, 3; Speedball 2; Quest Club; Football 
Dance Committee. — Collecting Snapshots 



JOSEPH B. PALLEIKO 

"Blackie" 
12 St. Paul Ave. Business School 

"Alone" 
Quest Club; Traffic Squad; Sophomore Class President; 
Justice of Court; Track 1, 2; Class Prophecy. 

— Dancing 



FRANCES ELLEN O'LEARY 

"Franny" 
18 Prospect Ave. Undecided 

"Angel" 
Quest Club; Tennis 1, 2; Photography Club 1; Usher 
H for 1937 Graduation. — Photography 











EDWARD ADRIAN PAOLUCCI 

"Ed" 
408 Washington St. Deisel Engineering School 

"The Sheik Of Araby" 
Dramatic C^ub: Football; Track; Senior Piny; Rill? Club; 
Advertising Staff; Quest Club; Debating Society; Pub- 
licity Director. — Photography 

HELEN THERESE PAZNIOKAS 

"Pazie" 
58 Heaton Ave. Nursing 

•'Take Me Out To The Ball Game" 
Quest Club; Traffic Squad; Senior Advisor; Basketball 
1, 2, 3; Senior Play, Program. 

— Reading, Sketching 

EUGENIA FLORA PAOLUCCI 

"Jeanne" 
394 Nahatan St. Art School 

"These Foolish Things" 
Tennis 1, 2; Glee Club 1, 2; Quest Club; Senior Play 
Committee; Usher for Senior Play; Photogi-aphy. 

— Painting 

HELEN ANN PENDERGAST 

"Del" 
11 East Hoyle St. Katherine Gibbs Secretarial School 

"You're A Sweetheart" 
Quest Club Governing Board 2, 3; Student Council 
Dramatic Club 1, 2, 3; Senior Play; Cheerleader; Junior 
Prom Committee; Senior Dance Committee; Tennis 1, 2, 
3; Senior Advisor. — Dancing, Tennis 

MADELINE ESTELLE PAOLUCCI 

408 Washington St. Nursing 

"The Glory Of Love" 
Ph tography Club; Quest Club; Glee Club; Tennis 1, 
2; Year Book Committee. — Photography 

PHILIP DOMINIC PENDERGAST 

"Phil" 
30 Pleasant St. Radio School 

"He Ain't Got Rhythm" 
Track 1, 2; Debating Club 1, 2, 3; Debating Team; 
Quest Club; Mass. Safety Campaign 3; Dramatic Club 
Play; Senior Play. — Amateur Radio 



Simmons College 



IRENE RAUHA PALONEN 

10 Johnson Court 

"Lovely Lady" 
Quest Club; Glee Club; Dramatic Club 1, 2; Junior 
Prom Committee; Traffic Squad; Debating Club 1; Senior 
Class Play; Football Dance Committee; Year Book Com- 
mittee. — Music 

ELMER LOREN PIKE 

"Shyster" 
51 Winslow Ave. Work 

"Truckin" 
Student Council; Cheerleader 1, 2, 3; Quest Club 1, 2, 
3; Vice-President 3; Football Dance Committee; Junior 
Prom Committee. — Dancing 



BARBARA JANE PASCOE 




"Bart" 




96 Chapel St. 


Undecided 


"So Nice Of Yon" 




Quest Club. 


— Skating 



BENJAMIN A. POLOVITCH 

"Dupe" 
1121 Washington St. Work 

"What's Your Business" 
Sophomore Play; Quest Club. — Butchering 




^ 



dtM 






JOSEPH RILEY 

"Buddie" 
82 Maple St. Norwich University 

"When I draw Up' 
Orchestra; Quest Club; Band; Latin Club; Student 
Council. — Baseball 

LENA M. PURPURA 

"Tex" 
34 Sturtevant Ave. Undecided 

"Let's Build A Little Home' 
Usher for Senior Play; Quest Club. 

— Singing and Dancing 



82 Maple St. 



VERONICA ANNE RILEY 

"Ronnie" 
Wellesley or Smith 
"Sweet As A Song" 
Quest Club; Traffic Squad; Orchestra; Year Book; 
Junior Prom Committee; Football Dance Committee; 
Senior Advisor; Class Will. 

— Music 

FRANCIS WILLIAM QUANN 

"Franny" 
18 Plimpton Ave. Northeastern University 

"You've Got Everything" 
A. A. Council 1, 2, 3; Quest Club Representative 1, 2; 
President of Quest Club 3; Traffic Squad; i ootball 1, 2, 
3, Co-Captain 3; Track 1, 2, 3; Golf 2, 3; Junior Prom 
Committee; Usher Junior Prom; Usher Senior Prom. 

— Contract Bridge 



ELMER V. RINTALA 

"lima" 
Massachusetts Nautical School 
"Hittin' A New High' 
Basketball; Track; Indoor; Quest Club; Traffic Squad. 

— Music 



53 Savin Ave. 



BILLY RASIMOVICH 

"Bill" 
24 St. John Ave. 

"It's About Time' 
Quest Club. 



Work 



AVARD ROBBLEE 

"Pete" 
75 Walnut Ave. Navy Air Corps 

"Have You Met Miss Jones" 
Quest Club; Track. 

—Motors 

BARBARA RATHBUN 

"Barbie" 
52 Bond St. Work 

"Join The Navy' 
^ Traffic Squad; Quest Club; Glee Club; Senior Play; 
Senior Advisor; Junior Prom Committee. 

— Crocheting 

KATHLEEN SCOTT ROBERTSON 

"Kath" 
66 Hoyle St. Secretarial School 

"I'll Take You Home Again, Kathleen" 
Junior Prom Committee; Tennis; Quest Club; Basket- 
ball; Senior Play Committee; Year Book Committee; 
Junior Prom Committee. — -Cooking 

LUCILLE WARNER RIEMER 

"Lucy" 
62 Winter St. Smith College 

"You've Got Something There" 
Orchestra; Quest Club; Swimming; Year Book Com- 
mittee; Sophomore Party Committee; Junior Prom Com- 
mittee; Senior Play Committee; Football Dance Com- 
mittee. — Dancing 




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Avh 








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v 



EDNA MARY RAMBOLA 

"Eddie" 
115 Chapel St. Wilfred Academy 

"Tonight, Lover, Tonight" 
Senior Adviser; Quest Club; Football Dance Commit- 
tee; Glee Club; Class Day Usher. — Ice Skating 

ADAM SCOTT, JR. 

"Scotty" 
25 West St. Uncertain 

"Truckin' On Down" 
Home Room Representative 1, 2, 3; Football 1; Traffic 
Squad; Quest Club; Track 3; Usher at 1937 Graduation; 
Usher at Junior Prem; Ring Committee; Junior Prom 
Committee. — Dancing 



MARGARET J. RYAN 

14 Monroe St. Nursing 

"Moma Oh Moma" 
Quest Club; Dramatic Club; Graduation Usher; Decora- 
tion Committee of Junior Prom. — Ice Skating 



MARGARET SHEEHAN 

"Marge" 
23 Hcyle St. Burdett 

"Your Eyes Have Told Me So" 
Quest Club; Athletic Association; Tennis 1. 

— Tennis 



SEELEM SAARINEN 

"Seeley" 
538 Walpole St. Bentley 

"The More I Know" 
Rifle Club; Quest Club; Traffic Squad; Football Dance 
Committee. — Stamps 





-«^ 







JOSEPH SILVESTRI 

"Buff" 
8 Tremont St. Work and Night School 

"South America)) Joe" 
Quest Club; Senior Play Production Staff. 

— Farming 



JOSEPHINE ANNE SAWKIEWICH 

"Jo" 
10 Hartford St. Mrs. Gillis' School 

"You're Slightly Terrific" 
Quest Club; Usher at Senior Play; Basketball; Ticket 
Committee, Junior Prom. — Dancing 



NELLA J. L. SMELSTOR 

"Nellie" 
1182 Washington St. Undecided 

"Who's Afraid Of Love" 
Quest Club; Glee Club; Senior Play Committee. 

— Reading 



ELIZABETH SCHROEDER 

"Betts" 
83 Wilson St. Art School 

"Be Careful With Those Eyes" 
Quest Club; Quest Club Executive Board; Year Book 
Staff; Traffic Squad; Junior Prom Committee; Football 
Dance Committee. — Sketching 



HELEN M. SMITH 

131 Roosevelt Ave. Work 

"Boy Meets Girl" 
Senior Play Usher; Quest Club; Photography Club; 
Debating. — Photography 









ALAMA L. SPEARWATER 

85 Chapel St. Bridgewater State College 

"You're Laughing At Me" 
Dramatic Club 3; Quest Club; Senior Play; Traffic 
Squad; Tennis. — Dramatics 



NATALIE SINGLETON SMITH 

"Nat" 
21 Beech St. Colby Junior College 

"Sweet Someone" 
Quest Club; Traffic Squad; Dramatic Club; Senior Ad- 
viser; Swimming Team; Junior Prom Committee; Foot- 
ball Dance Committee. — Swimming 




30 Oolah 
Football 


Ave. 
3; Tr 


ack 3. 


'Just 


A 


G 


JOHN K. SPIERDOWIS 

"Hotty" 
Georgia Tech 
igolo" 

— Pocket Billiards 


tOSE E. SMITH 

"Smitty" 
64 Lenox St. 

Quest Club. 




"Dc 


Love 


■W 




—Playing 


Work 
Piano 




ANTHONY RALPH STANAVICH 

"Stan" 
63 Highview St. Physical Education 

"To Mary, With Love" 
Football 1, 2, 3; Baseball 2, 3; Traffic Squad; Quest 
Club. —Poultry 



STASIA E. SMITH 

"Smitty" 
26 St. George Ave. Nursing 

"Just A Quiet Evening" 
Basketball; Quest Club. — Reading 




14 St. John Ave. 



JOHN PAUL STUPAK 

"Stu" 
Northeastern 
'Cuban Pete" 

— Criminology 



MARY E. SORJANEN 

"May" 
99 Concord Ave. Business School 

"What's Your Business 
Senior Dance Committee; Senior Play Committee; Quest 
Club. — Gardening 



OIVA O. SULONEN 

"Osk" 
26 Chapel Court Oxford 

"Vw Shooting High" 
Basketball 2, Captain 3; Track 2, 3; Traffic Squad; 
Quest Club. — Knitting 



RUSSELL L. SPACHMAN 

"Russ" 

"Life Begins At Sweet Sixteen" 
Senior Play; Quest Club; Dramatic Club; Football Dance 
Committee. — Tennis 






ANDREW AUGUST SUNDGREN 

"Lefty" 
35 Munroe St. Work 

Shoe Shine Boy" 
Quest Club; Baseball 3. — Stamp Collecting 



MARTHA LOUISE TAYLOR 

"Tonie" 
104 Nichols St. College 

"The Girl Who Couldn't Be Kissed" 
Orchestra 1, 2, 3; Senior Advisor; Traffic Squad; Cheer 
Leader 3; Class Secretary 3; Ring Committee; Quest 
(_iub; Junior Prom Committee; Football Dance Commit- 
tee; Senior Prophet; Swimming 2, 3. — Swimming 



TOIVO WILLIAM SUOMI 




"Toot" 




28 Melville Ave. 


Work 


"Trailin' To The Icebox" 




Senicr Play; Quest Club. 


— Reading 



ALBINA THOMPSON 

"Babbie" 
9 Hartford St. Nursing School 

"All You Want To Do Is Dance" 
Tennis 1, 2, 3; Quest Club. — Dancing 



WALTER J. SURETTE 

"Frenchie" 
54 Hill St. Work 

"I'm Building Up To An Awful Let Down" 
Baseball 1, 2, 3; Quest Club; Rifle Club 1, 2. 

— Hunting 



MICHAEL F. TRIVENTI 

"Mike" 
104 Cedar St. Undecided 

"The Little Silk Worm" 
Orchestra 1, 2, 3; Traffic Squad; Rifle Club 1, 2, 3; 
Senior Play Committee; Quest Club Governing Board 3. 

— Hunting 



VERONICA A. TAREILA 

"Vera" 
13 Tremont St. Nursing 

"Over The Perfume Counter 
Quest Club. — Swimming 






BRONIUS MACADON UZDAWINIS 

"Bart Davis" 
26 St. Joseph Ave. R.C.A. Radio and Television 

"Down With Love" 
Home Room Representative 1, 2; Traffic Squad. 

— Radio Ham 



RITA MARIE TARPEY 

48 Prospect Ave. Chandler Business School 

"Where Are You" 
Quest Club; Dramatic Club 3; Senior Play. 

— Reading 



NELLIE HELEN VENSKUS 

"Nell" 
47 Cedar St. Nursing 

"It's A Lot Of Idle Gossip" 
Quest Club; Archery; Quest Club Party Committee 
2, 3. — Dancing 




■- * 



FREDERICK RICHARD WENSTROM 

"Dick" 
215 Washington St. Work 

"More Power To You" 
A. A. Representative; Quest Club; Basketball 1, 2; 
Track 3; Football 3. —Shop Work 



WILLIAM JAMES WALKER 




"Whacker" 




170 Pleasant St. 


Work 


"Me and Marie" 




Quest Club. 


— Engines 




DOROTHY PATTEN WHEDON 

"Bubbles" 
5 Sturtevant Ave. Charles Commercial School 

"/ Found A Dream" 
Quest Club; Archery; Basketball; Debating Club. 

— Reading 



JOHN J. WALL 

"Wrecker" 
70 Casey St. 

"I'm In My Glory" 
Football 1, 2, 3; Baseball 1; Quest Club. 

— Tiddle Winks 



ERNEST JULIUS WTESMANN 

"Ernie" 
176 Roosevelt Ave. Prep School 

"/ Can't Be Bothered Now" 
Quest Club. — Camping 



THOMAS P. WALLACE 

"Tom" 
227 Prospect St. U. S. Navy 

"I've Got A Heavy Date" 
Baseball 1, 2, 3; Quest Club; Traffic Club. 

— Books 



6 Andrews Place 



Quest Club 1, 2, 3. 



"Loafuf Time" 



STASIA S. WILKES 

"Greenie" 

Undecided 

— Reading 



PHYLLIS E. WALLIS 

"Coogie" 
55 Railroad Ave. Burdett College 

"With A Banjo On My Knee" 
Quest Club; Glee Club 2, 3; Traffic Squad; Senior Ad- 
visor. — Singing 



JOHN W. WILLIAMSON 

"Red" 
66 Winter St. Dartmouth 

"Too Marvelous For Words" 
Golf 1, 2, 3; Homeroom Representative 3; Year Book 
Staff; Track 3; Quest Club; Usher, Senior Prom; Foot- 
ball Dance Committee; Junior Prom Committee; Class 
Ring Committee. — Golf 



VIRGINIA M. WASELUNAS 

"Vi" 
24 St. George Ave. Burdett College 

"/ Wished On The Moon" 
Traffic Squad; Quest Club; Senior Adviser; Senior Play. 

— Reading 







ROBERT THORN WINSLOW 

"Moogie" 
14 Florence Ave. Work 

"Today I Am A Man" 
Football 2, 3; Quest Club. — Motorcycling 



JOHN ZIERGIEBEL 

"Baron" 
22 Mountain Ave. Work 

"Here Comes The Sand Man" 
Football 1, 2. —Woodwork 



GEORGE ARTHUR WOOD 

"Dapper" 
157 Rock St. Work 

"And They Said It Wouldn't Last" 
Quest Club; Football 2. — Motorcycling 



MARJORIE C. BEMIS 

"Margie" 
119 Vernon St. Work 

"I've Got My Love (ly) To Keep Me Warm" 
Quest Club; Sophomore Play; Senior; Dramatic Club 1, 
2, 3; Cheer Leader; Football Dance Ticket Committee. 

— Swimming 



CARROLL H. WOODS, JR. 

"Butch" 
1 Parkway Dartmouth 

"Gee! But You're Swell" 
Class Treasurer 1; President 2, 3; Debating Club 1, 2, 
3; Quest Club; Traffic Squad; Rifle Club 1, 2. 

— Photography 



ANNE MARIE PECKHAM 

"Pecky" 
57 Davis Ave. Wilfred Academy 

"You Turned The Tables On Me" 
Quest Club 1, 2, 3; Junior Prom Committee. — Art 



ANTHONY A. WOZNIAK 

"Hoiman" 
80 Morse St. Oxford , 

"I've Got To Get Hot" 
Football 1, 2, 3; Traffic Squad; Quest Club. 

— Crocheting 






33 Cross St. 
Football 3. 



ROBERT S. JOHNSON 

Work 

'Taint No Use" 

— Riding 



HELEN I. WYTONES 

"Whites" 
58 Hillside Ave. 

"Outside Of Yon" 

Quest Club. 



Undecided 
-Collecting 



17 Highland St. 



DOROTHY ELDORA READEL 

"Rascal" 
Exploring 

"So Rare" 

— Swimming 



FRANCIS EDWARD TOHOSKY 

"Frank" 
325 Nahatan St. Portrait Photography 

"A Picture Of Me Without You" 
Rifle Club 1, 2, 3; Quest Club; Photography Club. 

— Photography 




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JUNIOR OFFICERS 




HISTORY OF THE JUNIOR CLASS 

PLAY: The Voice of '39 (in 2 Acts) 
SETTING: Norwood Hich School 
CHARACTERS: Members of Class of 1939 
TIME: 1936 - 1938 



The curtain rose in September, 1936 upon the triumphal entrance of the Class 
of '39 into the High School and thence into school activities. The leading characters 
of our first act were Thomas Folan, Margaret Kelley, Betty Shackley, David Butters, 
Jennie Patinsky and Alice O'Brien. The supporting cast gave sterling performances 
at the Sophomore Play and Sophomore Party. The brilliant performances of our 
athletes have been duly applauded. 

The twin social events in Act II, the Junior Party and Prom proved equally 
successful. At the Prom the principals of this act — Renaldo Fatch, Matthew Folan, 
Martin Lydon, Jerome Daunt, Jennie Patinsky and Alice O'Brien led the Grand 
March. 

In March. 1938 death marked the exit of only one of our players — Francis 
Kirby. 

Now there comes a pause — Intermission. Soon the curtain will rise for the 
last time upon the final, most significant act. The stage is set, everything in readi- 
ness. We know that more action, drama, suspense and thrills lie behind that curtain. 

Still we must wait. 




JUNIOR ROOM NO. 103 




JUNIOR ROOM NO. 106 




JUNIOR ROOM NO. 109 




JUNIOR ROOM NO. 1 10 



* f * » t 

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JUNIOR ROOM NO. 115 




JUNIOR ROOM NO. 1 16 




JUNIOR ROOM NO. 117 




JUNIOR ROOM NO. 122 




JUNIOR ROOM NO. 222 



CLOUDS 

The clouds sail gently on their way 

Upon a sea of azure blue. 

Their forms are odd — 

Gnomes dancing now, 

Then, a bull with cushioned horn 

Upon which rides a warrior bold. 

With robes a-flying in the wind — 

The gnomes sail on, 

The bull sails too, 

And with him comes the warrior bold. 

No thought is given to mortals cold 

All in a brawling world their own, 

Blind to the dancing gnome and bull. 

If mortals could but stop to see 

The gentle, free and happy way 

The gnome and warrior live their lives 

They too, might spend an hour short 

In gentle, free and happy way; 

And benefit by what they see 

When lying on a patch of green, 

A looking at a warrior bold, upon a cushioned horn. 



BETTY SCHROEDER '38. 



v *2 * v. 



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SOPHOMORE OFFICERS 




SOPHOMORE CLASS HISTORY 

By Wednesday, September 8, 1937, everything had been made ready at Norwood 
High School for the bewildered crowd of 250 members of the Class of 1940. For 
the majority of the confused and perplexed group, it was their first official session 
at the "School on the Hill". The stairways and corridor traffic were difficult to 
understand and many strove desperately to find their right classroom. This caused 
worry for a short while. But that was September! How we have advanced, after 
becoming acquainted with the School! From a band of helpless objects of pity and 
scorn of the two upper classes, we have progressed to a well organized group, with 
numerous notable achievements accomplished in the year. 
Debating: — Coached by Mr. Butler, we are represented by eight members on the 

debating team who have justified the class by notable performances. 
Music: — Here we appear to have a distinct interest and as about one half the orches- 
tra is composed of Sophomores, we must also have undisputed talent. 
Athletics: — We are certainly athletically inclined, as the class has been duly repre- 
sented in different sporting events. We had 25 boys on the football squad; in 
basketball 7 more were selected; in indoor track we had 9 boys competing. 
Dramatics: — The histrionic ability of the sophomore actors was quite evident in 
their presentation of the Christmas Play. Very ably coached by Miss Gray, the 
sophomore stars presented a play well worth high school rating. This production 
revealed hidden talent in several instances. 
Social: — Our main social function of the year was the Sophomore Party, which was 
held on the evening of October 28. Many of our class regard it as the high light 
of the social season. Much of the success of the affair should be accredited to Miss 
Coughlin, our Class Adviser, who was very active in trying to have all present have 
an enjoyable evening. 




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SOPHOMORE ROOM NO. 203 




SOPHOMORE ROOM NO. 204 




SOPHOMORE ROOM NO. 205 







SOPHOMORE ROOM NO. 210 




SOPHOMORE ROOM NO. 21 




SOPHOMORE ROOM NO. 212 




SOPHOMORE ROOM NO. 218 




SOPHOMORE ROOM NO. 219 



DREAMS 

To find a nook where thoughts can stray, 

To spare an hour or two, 

To dream of travel, music and art 

Is what I like to do. 

I sail upon the seven seas 

In quiet and repose, 

And learn the tongues and ways of man, 

And don their native clothes. 

I write a book, and tell the tales 
Of all that I have done, 
I paint in oils a pastoral scene 
Of lakes, of hills, of sun. 

I compose a tune, I write a verse, 
To make a song of spring, 
Of grass, of trees, of flowers, of bees, 
Of clouds, of birds on wing. 

These dreams then fade, the glamour gone, 
And my thoughts then gladly roam 
To a truer, happier, more peaceful place, 
Back — to my own home. 



IRENE PALONEN '38. 



^Illilll 





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QUEST CLUB 




President: FRANCIS QUANN 



Director: RUTH GOW 



The Quest Club was originally organized by the Class of 1925. 
Its purpose is to further the education of its members in other 
ways than scholastic. Most every student of Norwood High is a 
member, the dues being some voluntary participation in fulfilling 
the club's purpose. Its chief activity is to complete the Christmas 
joy of the less fortunate children of Norwood. 

At these parties each child is escorted by a senior member of 
the club. After playing games and singing carols Santa Claus 
comes down the chimney and presents each child with a pair of 
mittens, a game, toy, apples and pop corn. After refreshments 
they are taken home by the questers. 

Proceeds from a movie and contributions from town citizens, 
Norwood High School graduates and students, made last year's 
Christmas party to many deserving children, a complete success. 






DRAMATIC CLUB 




President: GERTRUDE MASON 



Director: MISS GRAY 



The year 1937-38 has heen a most successful one for the tlies- 
pians. With forceful leadership, excellent supervision and an in- 
creased membership, the club planned a novel and interesting pro- 
gram. This included a series of gay parties which conveniently 
came during the Christmas season, on Valentine's Day and on 
April first. 

Most noteworthy play was "Who Gets the Car Tonight." This 
was directed and produced by the members. The proceeds were 
used to purchase a set of new screens which will aid next year's 
members in presenting bigger and better productions. 

The rendezvous of the club is room 117. The day is Friday. 
A large group always attends, for the Dramatic Club has grown in 
popularity with the students here on the hill. In fact, anyone 
wishing to make a sound investment in extra curricular activities 
needs only to try out the Dramatic Club. 



TRAFFIC SQUAD 




Director: MR. HAYDEN 



Captain: BERNARD BERGMAN 



The Traffic Squad was organized in 1933 by Mr. Lincoln D. 
Lynch, present Superintendent of Schools in Norwood. It is now 
under the supervision of Mr. Hayden, submaster of the High School. 

The purpose of this organization is to maintain order among 
the students. To accomplish this, officers are stationed, between 
classes, at various posts throughout the corridors and locker-rooms. 

Any violator of the traffic laws is duly summoned to appear at 
the student court, where a sentence is handed down by three judges, 
Joseph Palleiko, Francis MacCauley and Donald Alden. 

Officers are carefully chosen for their good scholastic record, 
character and citizenship. LJnless the standard of a member re- 
mains high, he is asked to resign. 

The captain of the group is Bernard Bergman and his able 
lieutenants are Beatrice Coleman, Irene Costello, John Breen, Phil- 
lip Ekholm and Harvey Nutter. 



DEBATING CLUB 




Precide.-it: JAMES DCNOVAN 



Director: MR. JAMES BUTLER 



The Debating Club, under the leadership of Mr. James Butler, 
luid a large membership this year. Most of the members were new- 
comers from all classes who showed good possibilities. Many 
debates were arranged so that experience and practice for delivery 
could be acquired. Taking this into consideration, the teams this 
year did very well in their debates with Portland and South Port- 
land, Maine; Somerville, Girls High, M. I. T. Freshmen, Hingham, 
Weymouth, Newton, New Bedford and Quincy. 

Members of the Debating Club actively assisted this town in 
its participation in Gov. Hurley's safety drive. They spoke before 
various organizations and all the schools of Norwood. 

The club was made up of the following: 

President — James Donovan. 

Publicity — Edward Paolucci. 

Teams — Seniors: Ingrid Eklof, Irene Palonen, Salme Krusela, 
Hilda Frank, Helen Smith, Phil Pendergast. 

Juniors: James Shyne, Renaldo Fatch. 

Sophomores: Leona Baleman, Phoebe Ann Hayes, Shirley 
Badger, Genevieve Boyd, Louis Maguire, Arthur Allen, Jean Rob- 
ertson and Ann Horton. 



RIFLE CLUB 




President, IRVING BERKLAND 



Director, CLIFFORD WHEELER 



The Norwood High School Rifle Cluh, under the capable guid- 
ance of Mr. Wheeler, started its season off well by invading Beverly 
to defeat the Beverly Rifle Club, composed entirely of girls. In the 
return match they were defeated. This was the first shoulder to 
shoulder match that was fired against a group of girls in the history 
of the Rifle Club. 

The High School Rifle Club does all of its firing in the attic of 
the Municipal Building. This range was secured through the gen- 
erosity and good graces of Mr. Kendrick, the town manager, and 
the Rifle Club is highly indebted to him. 

Meetings are held on Thursday evenings for the older members 
of the club, while Friday evening is reserved for the new members. 

The existence of the Rifle Club has been made possible simply 
and solely through the untiring efforts and sacrifices of Mr. Wheeler. 
He devotes his time generously to the boys who are interested and 
willing to learn, and he may be found during any Thursday or 
Friday evening giving his time and attention to the boys, when he 
could be spending his time elsewhere to greater personal advantage. 
On the range he instills in the boys a greater sense of patience, 
concentration, self-control and co-ordination of eye and muscle. All 
of the success that the Rifle Club has enjoyed can be traced to the 
indefatigable Coach Wheeler, and the members of the Rifle Club 
of the Class of "38" as well as the younger members, offer their 
undying gratitude and friendship to him with whom we have been 
so closely associated during the past three years. 

The officers of the Rifle Club are as follows: Irving Berkland, 
President; Theodore Hyora, Vice-President; Jack Berkland, Secre- 
tary; Gus Lanier, Treasurer; John Dower, Range Officer. 



ORCHESTRA 




Director: PROFESSOR JOHN V. DETHIER 



When music was first introduced in ihe Norwood Schools, the 
students of the Junior and Senior High Schools were combined to 
form one orchestra of 18 pupils. 

As the interest in music grew and more pupils desired to join 
the orchestra, two separate groups were formed. One was for 
Junior High students and the other for the Senior High School, 
consisting of 50 each. 

For a number of years rehearsals were held after school every 
Monday and Tuesday. Later the sixth period of the same two 
days was devoted to music work, and in September, 1937, it was 
decided that orchestra classes should be held four periods a week 
for those who wished it. 

The orchestra plays at school assemblies, Senior Play and 
graduation. Often outside organizations ask the group to entertain 
al special gatherings. 

Every year certain members of the orchestra are chosen to 
represent our school at the New England Music Festival, which is 
held in different cities of New England. 



MUSIC— MAJOR PUPILS 




Director: PROFESSOR JOHN V. DETHIER 



Music Major Classes I and II are divided into three sections: 
harmony, music appreciation and voice training. Harmony I 
teaches the fundamentals of harmonizing and arranging chords 
correctly. The second year offers a course more advanced along 
this same principle and students write their own compositions. 

The aim of the Music Appreciation course is to develop a love 
for good music and to learn the history of standard and recognized 
composers and compositions. A study is made of the development 
of music from the ancient period through the classical, romantic, 
modern, and contemporary periods. 

The Voice Training classes are relatively large in comparison 
to the other divisions of the course. Through Professor Dethier's 
masterful selection and direction of the compositions studied, the 
girls have learned to sing with more profound expression. As in 
previous years, the voice group rendered its services at many occa- 
sions. They entertained at the annual Military Ball and at P. T. A. 
meetings. Also for Junior and Senior High assemblies. 

Professor Dethier's music classes receive a vast knowledge of 
worldly facts as well as music. 

The mcmhership of this course is growing with the prospect 
of being one of the best liked courses at Norwood High. 



ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN 




Room 220 



Teacher: MR. FAIRBANKS 



Early in the year at a closs meeting, seniors were told of the 
contest that was being conducted between the home rooms. 

The purpose of the drive was to obtain advertisements for the 
year book and each senior was requested to bring in one ad. 

A chart was placed on tbe bulletin board and each day the 
progress of every home room was recorded. Room 220 was the 
leader continually, with the Library running a close second. At 
the end of the time allotted, however, Room 220 was pronounced 
winner with a score of 125 per cent. 

The members of the winning home room who deserve special 
mention for the great number of ads they suceeded in obtaining are 
Kathleen Robertson, Natalie Smith and Russell Spachman. 




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FOOTBALL 




Coach: H. 



Co-Captains: FRANCIS QUANN, NAIMI BADER 
BENNETT MURRAY Assistant Coach: JOHN SULLIVAN 



Coach "Benny" Murray's call for football candidates was 
answered by a very green squad. 

By the first game, the boys were fairly well drilled and tied 
Hudson 13-13. 

Norwood then proceeded to get better with each game, tying 
Framingham and Abington and defeating Needham, North Quincy, 
Milford, Canton, and Natick. 

Norwood and Dedham approached their annual game unde- 
feated. Due to injuries and playing conditions Norwood met with 
its first and only defeat. 

Co-Captains "Franny" Quann and Naimi Bader, as well as 
James O'Donnell, Harold Mattson, "Gus" Wozniak, John Wall, 
John Lanzoni, "Tony" Stanovich, John Kelly, Terry Barrett, 
"Chuck" Elias, Ray O'Brien and John Foley played their last game 
for Norwood High, in this game. 

It is interesting to note that both Framingham and Abington, 
who tied for first place in Class "C" Eastern Massachusetts Inter- 
scholastic Athletic Association, were both tied by Norwood. 

Another intereting fact is that Natick tied Dedham, Norwood 
beat Natick and Dedham beat Norwood. 

We wish good luck to Coach Murray and next year's Co-Cap- 
tains Donavan and Ruscetti. 



The past 


season's recorc 


: 








Norwood 13 


Hudson 


13 


Norwood 20 


Milford 





6 


Needham 





7 


Canton 





6 


Abington 


6 


7 


Natick 


2 





Framingham 








Dedham 


25 


6 


North Quincy 












BASKETBALL 




Captain: OVIA SULONEN 



CoDch: H. BENNETT MURRAY 



Coach Murray's basketball team closed a very successful sea- 
son, winning 7 games and losing 4. 

Norwood opened the season by defeating a powerful Natick 
team, 38-30. Later in the season, Norwood went to Natick and 
again won, 31-26. 

Norwood won both games from Framingham, 32-30 and 33-31. 
Captain Ovia Sulonens sharp shooting was the outstanding feature 
of these games. 

Norwood lost to Needham 29-25 but in the return game, Nor- 
wood crushed Needham 35-25. 

Norwood lost to a powerful Watertown team 23-18. 

In the most exciting game of the season the Norwood Mer- 
chants, composed of former high school stars, nosed out their 
younger opponents 33-31. The lead changed hands seven times 
with Thayer of the Merchants sinking the winning basket in the 
closing seconds of play. Naimi Bader starred for the High School 
with 12 points. 

Norwood lost two heartbreaking games to Walpole 23-20 and 
31-30. 

Norwood came from behind to crush Dedham 32-27 by un- 
leashing a blistering attack in the fourth period. Sulonen again 
was the high scorer. In the return game Norwood walked over 
Dedham 37-18. Johnson lead the Norwood attack with 10 points. 
Ekholm and Boyden were outstanding on defense. 

The starting line-up of Bader, Sulonen, Johnson, Boyden and 
Ekholm will graduate but we think that Captain Steve Coakley's 
next year's team will be a winning one. 



INDOOR TRACK 




Captain: HARVEY NUTTER 



Coach: CLIFFORD WHEELER 



At the beginning of the season what looked like a very strong 
indoor track team was hard hit by sickness forcing many star per- 
iormers to the sidelines, including Captain Harvey Nutter. Poor 
practice facilities also handicapped the team. 

The track team paid tribute to Adam Scott, who was taken 
seriously ill after running a splendid race in the Northeastern 
meet, by awarding him a sweater. 

In dual competition, Norwood defeated Boston College High 
School and lost to Dedham High. 

In the Eastern Seaboard Relay Carnival the one-lap team of 
Lanzoni, S. Kelley, J. Kelly and Dobson won medals. The twodap 
team of Quann, Butters, Alden and Hyora were barely beaten. 

"Eranny" Quann was the most consistent performer through- 
out the season. He won third place in the 45 yard hurdle race in 
the State meet. 

In a track novelty Norwood and Dedham combined teams to 
defeat a combined Chelsea and Milton team 46-26. 

Letter men who are graduating are Harvey Nutter, Francis 
Quann, John Lanzoni, Donald Alden, Elmer Rintale, James O'Don- 
nell, William Coughlin, John Kelly, Heimo Hyora and Theodore 
Hyora. 



OUTDOOR TRACK 




Captain: HARVEY NUTTER 



Coach: CLIFFORD WHEELER 



As this issue went to press the outdoor track team hadn't had 
any track meets, but we feel that Coach Wheeler will again turn 
out a very good team. 

With such star runners as Quann, Nutter, Coughlin, Hyora 
and Jiampietro back, we are almost sure that the team will be 
undefeated in dual competition and may probably better last year's 
record of fourth place in the State Class "B" meet. 

The relay team should be excellent with such a field as Captain 
Nutter, Lanzoni, Quann, Coughlin, Alden and Hyora to pick from. 

Among the schools Norwood will meet in dual meets are 
Boston Trade, Boston College High School, Watertown, Waltham, 
Quincy, Framingham and Dedham. 

It is hoped that the outdoor team will not be so severely handi- 
capped by lack of practice facilities and sickness as was the indoor 
team. 



BOYS' TENNIS 




Captain: JAMES DONOVAN 



Coach: STANLEY FISHER 



A large squad responded to Coach Fisher's first call for prac- 
tice. As there are two veterans back and there is a promising crop 
of newcomers everything points to a very successful season. 

The veterans are Captain James Donovan and Joseph Murphy. 
From the ranks of the newcomers, the most outstanding are Paul 
Heffernan and Edward Pendergast. 

The boys have been practicing daily and judging from the way 
practice has been going the team is headed for a very good season. 

The schedule to date is as follows: 

Brockton at Norwood Norwood at Walpole 

Needham at Norwood Norwood at Wrentham 

Wrentham at Norwood Norwood at Needham 

Norwood at Brockton North Quincy at Norwood 
Walpole at Norwood 



GIRLS' TENNIS 




Captain: HELEN PENDERGAST 



Coach: MISS JOHNGREN 



The 1938 tennis squad which lined up in the gym for indoor 
practice in April certainly gave the coach renewed courage in plan- 
ning this year's schedule. The sophomore element looked excep- 
tionally hopeful and promised to add new strength to the already 
powerful juniors and seniors. 

Outdoor practice began with a mad rush. The new courts were 
broken in almost over night, and tennis for the moment was ceded 
number one sport here on the hill. 

After the mad rush had subsided and the crowds had retired to 
the sidelines, the following were picked: 

Captain Helen Pendergast, Leona Bateman, Margaret Connolly. 
Margaret Daunt, Lucille Fenton, Victoria Jacome, Elizabeth Mc- 
Call, Jane Pendergast, Jane Costello, Geraldine Slavin, Mary 
Riemer and Albina Thompson. 



GOLF 




Captain: JOHN FOLEY 



Coach: EVERETT LEARNARD 



Coach Learnard is very much impressed with the improvement 
his boys have shown in practice. As there are five veterans return- 
ing from last year's squad, the team looks forward to a very suc- 
cessful season. The veterans are John Williamson, John Foley, 
Francis Quann, Vincent Costello and Dick Pudsey. In practice 
these boys have shown signs of being an outstanding team. 

In a practice match the High School defeated the Alumni. 
John Williamson and Walter Gruesheski played outstanding games 
for the High School. Gruesheski is a sophomore and we predict 
that in the next two years he will develop into one of the best play- 
ers Norwood has had. 

We feel certain that John Williamson, who played excellent 
golf for the past two years, will continue his fine play throughout 
the season. 

Williamson, Foley and Quann will graduate this June, but 
Coach Learnard will have a good nucleus left to work with next 
year. 



GIRLS' BASKETBALL 




Captain: STEPHANIE AUKSTOLIS 



Coach: MISS KILEY 



An important item on the girls' winter sport calendar was 
basketball. All the teams had a successful season, but the laurels 
go to the varsity team, which came out victorious in every game. 

Captain Stephanie Aukstolis and Lucile Fenton put up an 
excellent fight to the keen competition offered in each game. 

The first team consisted of: Stephanie Aukstolis, Lucile Fen- 
ton, Stella Jusikiewicz, Adele Mainones, Helen Pazniokas, Julia 
Babel, and Priscilla Holman. 



The varsity scores were: 






Norwood 




26 


Natick 


25 


a 




2nds 


6 


" 2nds 


25 


« 






23 


Wellesley 


22 


a 




u 


21 


2nds 


17 


Other 


scores: 








Norwood 


Sophomores 


15 


Wellesley Sophomores 


12 


M 




Juniors 


27 


Juniors 


21 


a 




Seniors 


22 


Seniors 


21 


a 




Sophomores 


16 


Natick Sophomores 


16 


a 




Juniors 


6 


Juniors 


27 


a 




Seniors 


20 


Seniors 


29 


H 




Sophomores 


12 


Needham Sophomores 


14 


it 




Juniors 


15 


Juniors 


16 


it 




Seniors 


21 


Seniors 


20 



BASEBALL 




i Jh 




Coach: H. BENNETT MURRAY 



Though lacking an experienced battery, Coach Murray feels 
that his baseball team, winners of the Bay State League Baseball 
Championship for the past two seasons, will give a very good 
account of themselves this year. 

With such boys as Coakley, Surrette, Donavan, Stanovich, 
Bader, Conroy, Breen, and Boyden, we think that Norwood will be 
well represented on the diamond. 

There will be two veterans in the outfield, but the newcomers 
will make it hard for them to hold their positions. Last year's 
graduation took a heavy toll of the infield material, but present 
prospects encourage Coach Murray to feel that he will have a well 
drilled infield by the opening game. 

The schedule: I two games with each team) 
Norwood vs. Walpole Norwood vs. Wellesley 

Norwood vs. Framingham Norwood vs. Natick 

Norwood vs. Milford Norwood vs. Dedham 




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SENIOR PLAY 




Director: MISS GRAY 



Theatre-goers on the night of February 17, at the Junior High 
School, witnessed the great stage production "Life Begins At Six- 
teen". This three act comedy hit, with an all star senior cast, 
revealed hitherto hidden talent which might have gone unnoticed 
if it were not for the "get behind it and put it across" motto of 
the Seniors. 

We award a gold medal to every member of the cast for a 
line performance. An academy trophy to Miss Gray for her ex- 
cellent direction of the "raw material" that presented itself at the 
first rehearsal, and a lollypop to Marjorie "Snookie" Bemis. 

First mention to the prompter for those words that might have 
been needed. Second mention to the stage committee, electricians 
i-.nd the orchestra. Honorable mention to the ticket, advertising 
and checking committees, and a big hand for the Seniors. 



A HERO 

The cheers of the crowd at the afternoon track meet were still ringing in the 
ears of Jimmy Jones. He had set a new record in broad jumping and had aided in 
winning a decisive victory for his school in the relay. He had certainly been a 
hero. Whistling, and reviewing in his mind the afternoon's proceedings, he pre- 
pared himself for the dance celebrating the event. Abruptly his whistling stopped 
as he adjusted the orange tie he was going to wear. He stared at his image in the 
mirror and gulped. He suddenly came to the realization that tonight was the 
occasion at which he was going to invite Luella to attend, with him, the coming 
Senior Promenade. Oh shucks, thought he, I'll find something to say when I 
get there. 

So that evening the hero confidently entered the dance hall, nodding and smiling 
a "hello" to his classmates. The orchestra was playing a favorite waltz tune. Rather 
anxiously, he cast his eyes around the dance floor. What was that feeling at the 
pit of his stomach! Was his heart pounding just a little too hard! There she was! 
Shining in all her beauty! He took three steps forward but where was his courage 
that had never failed him. 

"Might as well get it over with," mused he; "I'll just go up to her and ask 
her point blank." 

With a great deal of determination, he strode up to Luella and invited her to 
dance. He asked her numerous questions about the weather and ordinary subjects, 
putting off the invitation until another dance. 

Dance after dance followed, the evening gradually wearing itself away. Still 
the question was not propounded. The hero had now worked himself up to nervous 
exhaustion. His pulse was beating madly. His throat was dry. His hands were 
clammy and shaking. His thoughts were confused. 

Finally, with a desperate effort, perspiration standing on his forehead, he drew 
her aside and blustered in broken sentences about the prom. 

A smile formed on her face as she said, "Oh, I've had an invitation." 

'Well, of all the . . . ", he expostulated. 

'But I refused," she interrupted. 

"Then ..." 

She nodded with a smile. 

Triumphantly, he led her back to the dance floor and they danced happily to 
the tunes of "Home Sweet Home". 

"Well," he mused, "that was no trouble at all — er — not much." 



-i 



IRENE PALONEN '38. 



GRADUATION 



The day has come. We leave this school 
With few, if any, fears. 
We leave in pride. We've struggled hard 
For twelve or thirteen years. 

The town may well be proud of us! 
We're destined to succeed! 
They taught us French and Latin here, 
And we know how to read. 

But though I'm happy, there's one thing 
Detracts from my enjoyment 
It's this: tomorrow I must walk 
The streets to seek employment. 

F. MACAULAY '38. 



SENIOR 


STATISTICS 


Best Looking 




Fred O'Dea 


Barbara Rathbun 


Most Popular 




Edmund Mulvehill 


Priscilla Holman 


Most Typical 




Carroll Woods 


Martha Taylor 


Most Athletic 




Francis Quann 


Stephania Auksrolis 


Class Flirt 




James Murphy 


Mary Magnani 




Lit 




^* «** 






SENIOR 


STATISTICS 


Zfrs/ Dressed 




Howard Horton 


Clara Dalton 


fiesJ Dancer 




Elmer Pike 


Helen Drummey 


Biggest Drag 




Irving Berkland 


Irene Palonen 


Mo5i Scholarly 


-i - 


George Butler 


Barbara Nichols 


Cutest 




Joseph Riley 


Elizabeth Schroeder 



LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT 



We, the Class of 1938, of the Norwood Senior High School, having with more 
or less effort survived three rigorous years on the Hill with nerves shattered, and 
hodies weakened, but with minds enough improved to placate a charitable and lenient 
examining authority, knowing that we have about completed the cycle of existence 
by law and custom allotted to us, regretfully realizing that we are about to depart 
from this indolent existence into an unknown and uncharted future for the purpose 
of distributing the vast property which we have accumulated, do hereby make, 
ordain, establish, publish, and declare this to be our last will, hereby revoking any 
and all other testamentary dispositions heretofore made by us. 

After we have with much difficulty made payment of all our just debts, and 
the expenses, incident and necessary to our departure, we give, devise and bequeath 
as follows: 

I. To Mr. Lynch and members of the School Committee we leave our heart- 
felt thanks and appreciation. 

II. To Miss Gow, Mr. Thompson, and Mr. Hayden we leave the class of 1939 
(to take our place if they can, which we doubt very much.) 

III. To Mr. Fairbanks, we leave an autographed copy of the "Crescent", to 

remind him of the many headaches and sleepless nights that he 
suffered in our behalf. 

IV. Franny Quann's and Naimi Bader's success as Co-captains of the football 

team we leave to Hacker Donovan and Zombi Ruscetti. 

V. Martin Lydon's "Contacts" over in Westwood we leave to Biag Tronti. 

VI. Johnny Kelly's meekness and quietness in the corridors and classrooms, 
we leave to Molly Riemer. 

VII. Russell Spachman's acting ability we leave to Levi Saulnen. 

VIII. To all the Junior and Sophomore girls we leave Francis Macaulay and 
James Murphy. 

IX. Helen Pendergast's and Marge Costello's popularity with the Dedham boys 
we leave to the undergraduates. 

X. To Professor Dethier we leave a more co-operative bass section. 

XL To Howard Horton's brother, Daniel, we leave their car, but not for the 
same purpose Howie uses it. 

XII. Mary Magnani's ability to talk with her eyes, we leave to her sister, Linda. 

XIII. Irving Berkland's "drag" we leave to his brother, Jack. 

XIV. Martha Taylor's collection of "A's" is bequeathed to Lois Butler, whom 

we think a most worthy successor. 

XV. We give Marion Henry's red bandanna to Frank Donovan. Use this for 
a necktie — you wolf. 

XVI. We leave Jack Donovan's "get up and go" spirit to Pauline Crouse. 

XVII. We leave Joe Riley's shoes to Jack Crowley. 



XVIII. We leave Elmer Pike's ability to swing around the dance floor to Thomas 
Peter Buster Folan. 

XIX. To all those who come in contact with Thomas Conroy we leave a bottle 
of Sloan's Liniment and our sympathy. 

XX. Mildred Lindblom's dimples are bequeathed to Shirley Engel. Do you 
sleep on collar-buttons too, Shirley? 

XXI. Gus Wozniak's way with the women we leave to Malcolm Orent. 

XXII. Priscilla Holman's class spirit we leave to any undergraduate who can 
follow in her footsteps. 

XXIII. Roy Hansen's managerial ability on the football team we leave to "Mustard" 

Foley. 

XXIV. Naimi Bader's athletic ability we leave to his brother, "Nicky". 

XXV. The friendship of Lucile Riemer and Clara Dalton we leave to any under- 
class girls who are big enough to keep it. 

XXVI. Walter Surrette's striking altitude to "Look me over girls, here I come" 
we leave to Laurie Smith. 

In conclusion we pray that no one herein mentioned will take offense at any re- 
marks, but will receive them in the manner in which they were given and intended. 

Given under this, our hand, on the seventh day of June, one thousand nine 
hundred and thirty-eight. 

(Signed) The Class of 1938 

(Witnessed) Veronica Riley 

Edmund Mulvehill 



ON BEING THE "BABY" OF THE FAMILY 

I am one of those poor unfortunates whose life must be forever clouded over 
by the fact that I am the "baby" of my family. May I assure you that this is a most 
dreadful state in which to find oneself? 

The first glimmer of this feeling came to me when I was about three years 
old. At this time, anything and everything I desired must be given to me at once, 
for I was the "baby" of the family and had to be catered to. A delightful feeling 
of power came to me and I thoroughly enjoyed and made the most of these situa- 
tions. 

When I reached the knowing age of four, I refused to be thought of as an 
infant any longer and demanded that my family stop treating me as the baby. Little 
did I know that for the rest of my natural life I was doomed to live under this 
"shadow". 

Most children are somewhat awkward in their teens, and I was no exception. 
I seemed to be possessed of long skinny legs ending in enormous feet; my hands 
were large and ungainly, and altogether I must have presented a picture to fill the 
soul with horror. Yet I was still the "baby" of the family. 

Though I try to act dignified and ladylike, sometimes I am tempted to abandon 
my dignified manners. Especially am I tempted when my mother meets some old 
friend of hers and says: "Oh, how are you Mrs. So-and-So? Yes, this is my baby!" 

MARY J. CURRAN, '38 



CLASS PROPHECY 



Time: 1950 

Place: World Book Fair, Los Angeles, California. 

Situation: Martha Taylor is autographing her latest book, "Memoirs of Foreign 

Travel." Joseph Pai.leiko pushes his way through the throng to see his old 

classmate. 

Joseph: Hello, Martha. This certainly is a coincidence. I never thought I should 
see you again, now that you are famous. 

Martha: Oh, I'm just here for a few days to autograph my hook. Come, tell me 
about yourself and what brings you here. 

Joseph : To begin with, by the blessing of "Lady Luck", I won the last sweep- 
stakes. To prove that I am not intellectually hopeless, I decided to take in the 
Book Fair on my trip around the world. 

Martha: Congratulations! You must have news from some of our old Norwood 
High School mates. 

Joseph: Do you remember James O'Donnell? It was he, the owner of the largest 
catering business in New England, who arranged a farewell banquet in my 
honor at the Norwood Hotel. Many of our old friends were present: Theodore 
Hyora, town manager; Philip Pender gast, town treasurer; Edward Doherty, 
fire chief; John Breen, chief of police; Augustus Lanier, superintendent of 
public schools; Pat Flaherty, district manager of the "Ecco" stores; Gora Cian- 
carelli, Leone Carlson, Ingrid Eklof, Grace Magnuson, teachers at Norwood 
High; Helen Bartulevich and Lena Purpura, well-known speed typists now 
connected with the Aukslolis and Baker School for Girls. Of course, George 
Wood and his wife, the former Edith Brierly were there to bid me adieu. 

Martha: What a send off you had! Your reference to teachers reminds me thai 
I ran across George Butler in Carthage. Now that he has succeeded our able 
Mr. Hayden, he prefers to present first hand information to his Virgil class. 
"Mac" Macaulay and John Kelley were acting as his able assistants, so they 
said, but I really think they were looking for modern Didos. 

Joseph: That wouldn't be surprising. 

But to continue my story. Amid the shouts and cheers of my fellow citi- 
zens, I boarded the train for New York. At the Hotel New Yorker I was greeted 
by Bruno "Davis" Uzdawinis. the manager, who, in the course of our conver- 
sation, told me confidentially that Adele Mainones is his private secretary. 

At dinner that evening I recognized the orchestra to be that internationally 
famous swing band "The Cavaliers," featuring David Hyyti, drummer, and 
Elmer Rintala, accordionist. 

At ten o'clock sharp the floor show started. John Wall, master of cere- 
monies, sang Terry Barrett's new song hit, "Lazy Man's Paradise." 

Martha: John Wall, a singer! Amazing things do happen for when I was in 
Montecarlo, I found Richard Hollister idling away his time and money at 
gambling. 

Were there any other stars whom I might know? 

Joseph: Lucille Fenton starred in a tap number. Clara Dalton and Lucille Riemer 
held their own in a dance routine from the latest Broadway hit. They are still 
two of a kind. 

Martha: Two of our classmates are here in Los Angeles now. After receiving the 
King Philip's ballroom in Wrentham as a gift for their faithful attendance, 
Mary Magnani and Albina Thompson aspired to bigger and better things, and 
are now proprietors of a nationwide chain of Dance Rendezvous. 



Joseph : I must see them before I go. 

The one act in the show that sent me into gales of laughter was put on by 
"Teddy" Mulvehill, "Beans" O'Brien, and Elmer Pike, now known as the three 
Nertz brothers. 

After the floor show the spotlight was focused on certain socialites: 
"Marty" Lydon, Broadway playboy; Thomas Flood, oil magnate; Rita Dona- 
hue, tobacco heiress; Jean Martin, New York's most versatile debutante; Rocco 
Molinari, motion picture star and idol of the fairer sex. Nevertheless, my eye 
was constantly on two cigarette girls, Helen Pendergast and Peggy Daunt, who 
appeared to be more popular than the socialites. 

Martha: It seems good to hear of all these people. I don't suppose you saw my 
old pal, "Ronnie" Riley. 

Joseph : No, but I read in the papers that she was to make her singing debut in 
"Town Hall" New York on the eighth of this month. I haven't heard since how 
the critics liked her but I know she will make good for she always had a lovely 
voice and the will to get ahead. 

At Belmont Park Michael Triventi, leading money rider of last year, rode 
the winner of the Belmont Futurity. Incidentally the horse belongs to Philip 
Mike, owner of the largest racing stable in the East. 

Martha: While witnessing the Grand National at Aintree, England, I saw Joe 
Silvestri, veteran jockey. When only two jumps from the finish, his horse threw 
him but Joe miraculously escaped serious injury. 

Joseph: At Madison Square Garden, I saw "Gus" Wozniak retain his wrestling 
title by defeating Harold Mattson in a no time limit match. Joe Riley was the 
referee. 

Martha: When I was in Rio de Janeiro, I heard a great deal about Wall Street's 
outstanding financier, Naimi Bader. Charles Bartkewicz is president of the 
Stock Exchange, and according to the Brazilians, those two boys know how to 
pick their stock. 

Joseph: At the N. B. C. studios I saw Regina Osipovich and Stella Juskiewicz 
singing their own snappy arrangements of hill-billy songs. Dorothy Whedon 
is there as an announcer. Richard Wenstrom and Channing Foss are employed 
as radio mechanics, Mary Mills gives helpful hints on home cooking, and 
Clifford McLatchey and Dennis Murphy, violinists in the Ford Symphony 
Orchestra, occasionally broadcast from this station. 

I wonder what has happened to "Sleepy" Donovan? 

Martha: Oh, he is the greatest hairdresser in all Paris. After he became bald, he 
was at such a loss as to what to do that he decided to take up his long loved art 
as a business. With him are John Dower, chief manicurist; Thomas Conroy. 
chief masseur; Anastasia McDonough, Alice Hartshorn, Margaret Sheehan, 
Laura Cormier and Edna Rombola, beauticians. 

Millie Lindblom, after winning several beauty contests, has opened an ex- 
clusive dress shop on the Rue de la Paix. Marion MacKenzie, Betty Shroeder, 
and A r line Masino are dress designers while Margaret Costello, Sylvia Glei- 
chauf, Marie Gray, Helen Cleary and Mary E. Curran are models. 

Joseph: Speaking of beauty, Irene Costello has gone a long way. It seems that 
the Hollywood producers looked far and wide for an actress whose beauty 
is more than skin deep. Irene, with her sweet disposition and lovable nature,, 
was the answer to their problem. 

Martha: Do you remember Harvey Nutter, Bill Coughlin and Adam Scott? They 
are on this year's Olympic track team and are favored in their respective events. 
Gladys Nordstrom is entered in the women's swimming event and Priscilla 
Nelson is in the diving contests. Edward Paolucci represents the U. S. A. in the 
150 pound boxing bouts. Helen Pazniokas has become an outstanding favorite 
in the woman's 220 yard dash. 

Joseph: Good luck to them. I read in last night's paper that Seelem Saarinen won 
a $10,000 Silence Marathon in Chicago. 



Martha: Silence is golden but not to Tony Stanavich, president of the Acme 
Rubber Company of Buenos Aires, who has been demoted to vice-president- 
his wife is president. 

Joseph: Chester Ambruskevich was recently arrested in South Norwood and 
charged with setting up a lottery. He was trapped by state troopers John Stupak 
and William Rasimovich. 

Martha: Have you heard about Roy Hansen? When I was in Natal, South 
Africa, he was trying to manage the natives, and if it hadn't been for James 
Ready, who was doing missionary work among them, they would have managed 
him. 

In the Tanganyika district I met John Spierdowis selling hot dogs to the 
cannibals. 

Joseph: I guess they go for "Hot Dogs" in a big way out there. 

Martha: They certainly do. He imports all his frankfurts from the New England 
Market owned by Bennie Polovitch. 

Joseph: Isn't it strange that our friends are scattered all over the globe? 

I attended a baseball game in Chicago not long ago between the Chicago 
White Sox and Boston Red Sox. The game developed into a bitter pitching duel 
with Pitcher John D'Espinosa finally winning his own game in the tenth inning 
by a smashing double that brought home his team-mate, Joe O'Loughlin. 
D'Espinosa yielded three hits in ten innings while his rival, Tommy Wallace, 
gave six. Walter Surrette played brilliantly at first base for the White Sox al- 
though they lost. 

Martha: That reminds me of a basketball game 1 viewed some time ago. Oiva 
Sulonen, Philip Ekholm, David Boyden and Russell Johnson displayed fine team 
work by fast passing and successful attempts for baskets. 

Joseph: Talk about baseball. You'd have died laughing if you had seen the 
donkey basketball game last winter between the business men of Norwood and 
Dedham. Toivo Suomi was high scorer with seven baskets to his credit, while 
his team-mates, Thomas O'Toole and John Ziergiebel had three apiece. Avard 
Robblee seemed to be on the floor more than on his donkey. 

Martha: That must have been a riot as was the time I visited the Bonica & Bailey 
Circus in London. The audience was kept in a joyous mood by the actions 
of the clowns, Jimmy Connolly, John Curran and David Curran. Priscilla 
Holman held the crowd tense in her trapeze act with Robert Winslow. As a 
special attraction, the show featured Marjorie Bemis, the only woman in the 
world to be shot from a cannon and hurled 200 feet through the air and yet 
live to tell about it. Alexander Blazis was the strong man of the show while 
Lawrence Hayes was selling peanuts, but from what I could see he ate more 
than he sold. Marion Henry, acting as barker at the freak sideshow, was yell- 
ing, "Right this way: Tickets a dime! See the new freak, half man and half 
wolf!" I fell for it as did all the other people. When I entered the tent, there 
sat "Smush" Foley as big as life. Marion shrieked with laughter each time she 
sold a ticket. 

What's happened to Marion Gallagher? 

Joseph: She has set up an information booth in Norwood. Helen Clancy, Kath- 
leen Robertson, Margaret Ryan and Francis Hanley are working with her. They 
know all the answers. 

Martha: I was entertained in royal splendor in Afghanistan by Carroll Woods, 
who is now dictator of that country. Donald Alden has just been appointed 
chief photographer while Irving Berkland is the editor of Afghanistan's leading 
newspaper. Leo Bazzy and Bernard Bergman are also in his service. It was 
quite a reunion. 

Joseph : John Williamson is now a commentator on foreign news and broadcasts 
every Tuesday night. Not long ago he announced that an American had been 
stirring up trouble in Venice. It proved to be Franny Quann, now a gondolier 



who had stolen all the trade from the Venetian Boys because of his appeal to 
the feminine sex. 

Another romantic character is John Lanzoni, highest paid opera vocalist 
on the air. 

Martha: What ever became of those two movie fans, John O'Brien and Vincent 
Kudirka? 

Joseph : They are no longer movie fans. They are both truant officers in Norwood. 
Their own past experiences enable them to be most efficient in finding the boys 
who try to skip school. 

Martha: In Switzerland Barbara Nichols and Beatrice Coleman are well-known 
for their exclusive girls' school. Martha Curran is head of the infirmary, 
Helen Banks is the dean of girls and teaches Latin on the side. Irene Palonen 
is a professor of American literature. 

Also well-known in Switzerland is Nellie Smelstor, renowned Alpine 
climber. Veronica Tareila often joins her in expeditions but she doesn't relish 
mountain climbing as much as Julia Babel, Josephine Babel and Elinor Chubet 
do. 

Joseph : Did you know thai Russell Spachman and lino Hallman have established 
a little theatre group in Norwood? In their cast are Alma Spearwater, Mary 
Breen, Margaret Keeler, Rita Tarpey and others prominent in the theatrical 
world. They have appeared in the leading playhouses and are now showing 
at the Ruth Oen and Francis O'Leary theatre in Philadelphia. 

Martha: They surely have used their talent to good advantage as did Berger 
Johnson and Robert Johnson, who are engineers in a road construction company. 

Joseph: If I'm not mistaken their company is the one that has been chosen by 
Governor George Elias of Massachusetts to build a new super highway from 
Boston to New York. Quite a controversy arose over the awarding of the con- 
tract. James Donovan, editor of the Boston Transcript, was one of the governor's 
severest critics. He claimed that the contract should have been awarded to the 
Joe Conroy and Fred Carlson Construction Company, which was reported 
to be the lowest bidder. 

Martha: Evidently there must have been something in back of all this, yet I doubt 
if Governor Elias would be guilty of a dishonest act. 

Joseph: Maybe he wouldn't but there are rumors that he accepted a "cut." Stasia 
Smith, Julia Dundulis, Stasia Wilkes, Helen Wytones and Caroline Notarangelo, 
members of the city council of Boston, are investigating his public life. 

Martha: Surely there must be more of our class-mates in social life. Helen 
Drummey and Josephine Sawkeiwich, organizers of a Spinster Club in Mel- 
bourne, Australia. 

Joseph: There surely are. Broivnie Green is president of the Norwood Bachelors' 
Union while Edwiga Bochanowicz is head of the Norwood Women's Club. Leo 
Murphy and Robert Both well belong to the Bachelors' Association. Angelo 
Benedelti, Margaret Byrne, Margaret McDonough, Mary McDonald and Mar- 
jorie Koch are prominent members of the Women's Club. 

Martha: Have you heard about Avard Johnson? He is now a shoe manufacturer 
in Caracas, Venezuela. In one of his stores he employs Phyllis Wallis, Margaret 
Campbell, Mary J. Curran and Margaret J. Costello as salesgirls. 

Joseph: Francis Tohosky walked the last mile some time ago. He was married to 
Helen Smith by the Reverend Frederick O'Dea. 

Martha: Have you heard about Jimmy Murphy's happy accident? He dropped a 
flat iron on his toe and injured the offending member to such an extent that he 
was taken to the Norwood Hospital. Natalie Smith was immediately transferred 
to his case. 

Joseph: She is enough to make anyone welcome a long rest. 

Last winter William Walker was injured at Mount Mansfield. He couldn't 
decide whether to go to the left or the right of a tree while he was skiing. 
Martha: That's too bad. Have you heard anything about Howard Horton? 



Joseph: His knowledge of salesmanship acquired at Norwood High has served 
him well. He is now Filene's best salesman. Since he entered this field, the 
sales on men's clothes, especially spats, have increased twenty per cent. 

Martha: Doesn't Salme Kuusela work there? 

Joseph : Yes. Karin Korhonen, Barbara Pascoe and Millie DeCosta are clerking 
there. Eugenia and Madeline Paolucci work in the credit department. 
Martha: That reminds me of John O'M alley. He is a floor-walker in Liberty's 
of London. 

Joseph: Bertha Kalliel and Sarnera Eysie have recently opened a hat shop in 
Montreal. Mary Sorjanen, Virginia Waselunas, Nellie Venshus and Petres 
Georgeu are working for them. 

Martha: Barbara Rathbun is very happy these days. In Hongkong I saw her 
painting pictures of the beautiful harbor. She travels with her husband, the 
captain of the "Queen Mary." 

Then, too, in Peiping, I visited Margaret Lyons. She is running a home for 
Chinese orphans. Mary Norton supervises the play-ground, Sally Deeb is chief 
dietician, and Lillian King sings the poor little things to sleep. 

In Shanghai I spied Connie Duffy riding in a jinrikisha drawn by Ray- 
mond McKale. 

Joseph: Oh, is she still riding around? 

Martha: Yes, and from the way she flipped dimes to all the Chinese kids, she 
must have acquired quite a fortune. 

Joseph: Have you read Heimo Hyora's book? His daring feats surely equal those 
of Richard Halliburton. 

Martha: Yes, I saw Heimo in Madrid, tripping the light fantastic with the Spanish 
senoritas. 

Joseph: Of all the amazing things! But I know of one to match that. Mary 
Maroney, Anne Peckham, Mary Anne O'Brien and Margaret Keady, woman 
butchers, have opened the largest meat market in Chicago. 

Martha: Rose Smith, Dorothy Readel and Mary Frances O'Brien are vacationing 
with their husbands in Bermuda. 

Dorothy Deeb and Helen DiMarzio are co-managers of the largest bicycle 
renting shop in Hamilton, Bermuda. Andrew Sundgren is their best customer. 

Joseph: What has happened to Ernest Wiesman? 

Martha: When I was in Honolulu, I was serenaded by a group of young men 
who were playing guitars beneath my window. Thrilled by the native music, I 
leaned from the window only to spy Ernest Weisman and Robert Breen caroling 
with the bronze natives. They were learning the art so that they can attract the 
attention of certain young ladies in Norwood when they return. 

Joseph : I understand that Hilda Frank is a missionary. 

Martha: She is doing a fine piece of work among the natives of Samoa. 

Joseph : Joe Slattery is doing all right these days, too. He owns the controlling 
stock of the Chrysler Corporation. 

Martha: I think that just about completes our list of class-mates, doesn't it? 

Joseph: No, siree! Surely, we mustn't forget to mention Gertrude Mason. Her 
splendid leadership has done much to further the World Peace Movement. 

Martha: My! What fun we've had discussing our schoolmates. What a grand 
class we turned out to be! 

MARTHA TAYLOR, '38 

JOSEPH PALLEIKO ; '38 



AD CLUB 




EDMUND MULVEHILL 



Instructor: MR. FAIRBANKS 



The Advertising Committee of the yearbook consists of a 
group from the Senior Class. These boys and girls got behind the 
advertising campaign and worked diligently for many weeks. It 
took many long hours after school to reach the advertisers and to 
ask them to help us in making "The Crescent" a success. This 
group kept on working until they finally reached the goal for which 
they were striving. Under the leadership of Mr. Fairbanks and 
Edmund Mulvehill, Lucile Reimer, Clara Dalton, John Kelly, Mil- 
dred Lindeblom, Carroll Woods, Francis MacCauley, Kathleen Rob- 
ertson, Frances Hanley, Madline Palucci, Bernard Bergman, Eugene 
Paolucci, Donald Alden, John Williamson, Francis Quann, Irene 
Palonen and Helen Cleary started out in the early part of January 
to accomplish work which they had agreed to do so willingly. 



CHEER LEADERS 




CLASS POEM 



I. 

To the school on the hill, we wended our way, 
Thrill'd and proud on that autumn morn. 
A Sophomores life before us lay — 
A High School career for us was born. 

II. 

Then came our proms, our games and plays; 

With them, hard work and exams galore! 

All too swiftly sped the days, 

fill the time came to leave that well-known door. 



III. 

As we toil in the years ahead, 
Menfries of High School will often return. 
The days that held for us such dread 
Will seem like a Haven for which we yearn. 

IV. 

Farewell, to those we hold in rnind- 
To classmates, friends and teachers all. 
The hearts of "thirty-eight" will find 
A longing sadness in the fall. 



marion Mackenzie '38. 



CLASS GIFTS 

The following is a list to be presented to the Graduates 
of the Class of Nineteen Hundred and Thirty-eight. It is the 
sincere wish of the TROUBLE-MAKERS, who are presenting 
them, to stimulate antagonism, and it is the sinrerest wish of 
said Trouble Makers that the antagonism hereby stimulated 
will be settled with gifts, not the givers. With the utmost sin- 
SLVR-ity we present the following gifts. 



Stephanie S. Aukstolis — basketball 

So you will always be able to practice for the "Big Shots. ' 
Josephine Babel — curling iron 

This is just a little start for a curly permanent wave. 
Julia Babel — ping pong paddle 

Use this to follow in your brother's footsteps. 
Eloise Baker — paper doll set 

We've already named it "GIGGLES' . 
Helen Banks — permanent out-of-the-room slip 

This will save the teachers a lot of trouble. 
Helen Bartulevich — bicycle 

Just to help you move a little faster, Helen. 
Marjorie Bemis — scotty dog 

To replace the one promised to you by Joe. 
Angela Benedetti — bow 

This will save you making one for your hair on graduation night. 
Edwina Bochanowicz — movie contract 

Many work up from the bottom. 
Mary Breen — pin 

Keep as neat as a pin in after life as you have in school. 
Edith Brierly — bell 

This is the nearest we could get to a wedding bell. 
Margaret Byrne — megaphone 

This is just to let the rest of us know when you are around. 
Margaret Campbell — date 

You'll have to take this one even though you don't want it. 
Leone Carlson — long history assignment 

You always did think they didn't give you enough to do. 
Elinor Chubet — 18 day diet 

A calorie a dav keeps the Doctor away. 
Gora Ciancarelli — a medal 

Eor the quietest girl in the class. 
Hele\ Cleaky — sunflower 

To match that sunny disposition. 
Beatrice Coleman — report card with numerous "F's." 

Miracles can happen you know. 
Laura Cormier — scissors 

To keep up your trimness. 
Irene Costello — bar of tasty-yeast 

Eat this Irene and see if it will give you pep, vim, and vigor. 
Margaret C. Costello — ticket to St. Paul 

He won't be able to "Chisel" in on this Marge. 






Margaret J. Costello — pick 

We realize how you are picked on in history. 
Martha Curran — speedometer 

This is just to time the number of words you can say in a minute. 
Mary E. Curran — 2 history papers 

So you can give one to Tommy. 
Mary J. Curran — phonograph record 

Here's a little competition for you, Mary. 
Clara Dalton — style book 

To enable you to keep up-to-the-minute on styles. 
Margaret Daunt — banner of N. H. S. 

To remind you of your splendid cheering during the football season. 
Millicent DeCosta — box of powder 

To hide that tell-tale blush. 
Dorothy Deeb — knife 

Carve yourself a career with this. 
Sally Deeb — pencil and pad 

To help you when you enter the business world. 
Helen DiMarzio — padlock 

So you can continue to keep yourself hidden. 
Rita Donahue — blueprint of a house 

To give you some ideas on the subject. 
Helen Drummey — watch 

This will help you get in earlier nights. 
Constance Duffey — taxi 

To give him some competition. 
Julia Dundulis — bottle of "golden glint" shampoo 

To help you keep those lovely locks. 
Ingrid Eklof — key to my heart 

This is just to let all the fellows know that your heart is padlocked, Ingrid, and 

that you have the only key. 
Sam era Esyie — pepsodent 

For that flashing smile. 
Lucille Fenton — ship 

So you won't have to wait so long for it to return. 
Hilda Frank — gag 

I don't know much about you, 

But keep this in the bag, 

Someone told me you talked a lot, 

So Fm giving you a gag. 
Marion Gallagher — book on how to memorize 

Memorize your history lesson, 

It's easiest way to do, 

Here's a book to give the method, 

And we hope it will help you. 
Petres Georgeau — pair of dark glasses 

To hide those dazzling eyes of yours. 
Helen Glancy — bottle of Vicks 

To stop those sniffles. 
Sylvia Gleichauf — some money to jingle 

Just a little ryhme for "Mingle(s)"- 
Marie Gray — Billy goat 

"But Billy doesn't get your goat, does he Marie?" 
Frances Hanley — ticket to traffic court 

You always did make a big hit with the traffic officers, Fran. 
Alice Hartshorn — bell 

Ring this so we'll know you're there. 



Marion Henry — picture of Jim 

So you will always have a reminder of those days spent in Economics class. 
Priscilla Holman — hockey stick 

This is so you can disable the Walpole Hockey Squad in more ways than one. 
Stella Juskiewicz — glue 

So you will always stick to your man. 
Bertha Kalliel — Arthur Murray's dance book. 

But maybe you know all the latest dance steps. 
Margaret Keady — lipstick 

We think you are old enough to use it. 
Margaret Keeler — cream 

To keep that school girl complexion. 
Lillian King — blank absent card 

You ought to be good at filling this one out now. 
Marjorie Koch — shoe taps 

For those soft walking heels. 
Karin Korhonen — handcuffs 

So you and Salme may always be together. 
Salme Kuusela — knitting needles and yarn 

You use these up so fast we thought we could save you a few $. 
Mildred Lindblom — teddy bear 

Do you think you can handle the two of them, Mil? 
Margaret Lyons — gum 

A substitute for chewing the rag. 
Marion McKenzie — winx 

To bring out the twinkle in your eyes. 
Mary Magnani — music box 

This is so you will be able to dance all the time. 
Grace Magnuson — well 

Still waters run deep. 
Adele Mainones — jar of mayonnaise 

Now will you be on the honor roll again, Dell? 
Mary Maroney — hairpins 

Long hair is a bother. 
Jean Martin — ticket to New York 

We hear you found something interesting down there. 
Arline Masino — savage doll 

Just a little reminder of Joe. 
Gertrude Mason — U card 

There's always a first time for everything "Gertie." 
Mary McDonald — Dentyne 

Is this how you keep your teeth so white? 
Margaret McDonough — bottle of milk 

A Doctor's prescription for the undernourished Peg. 
Anastasia McDonough — bottle of peroxide 

'Gentlemen prefer blondes you know!' 
Mary Mills — yeast cake 

To make you rise. 
Priscilla Nelson — home permanent wave set 

This will come in handy. 
Barbara Nichols — copy of Voo Doo. 

A new type of literature for you. 
Gladys Nordstrom — box of 'Ray'-sons 

May they never turn 'Green.' 
Mary Norton — glasses 

To help you find that gang of yours at night. 
Caroline Nortarangelo — anchor 

A little weight won't hurt. 



Mary Ann O'Brien- toy car 

A good car always comes in handy. 
Mary Augustine O'Brien — false face 

You always had such an innocent face. 
Ruth Owen — package of cigarettes 

Smoke these and maybe you will stop growing. 
Frances O'Leary — rabbit's foot 

To bring you luck after graduation. 
Regina Osipovitch — bottle of Listerine 

This will ease your throat after reaching those high notes. 
Eugenia Paolucci — car 

This is to go with your new driver's license. 
Madeline Paolucci — joke box 

There's an old saying, 'Laugh and grow fat'. 
Irene Palonen — burned out fuse 

Just an excuse for Walter to come down and check the "Wiren-(gl." 
Barbara Pasco — horn 

To let us know you are coming. 
Helen Pazniolcas — medal 

For your prowess as an athlete. 
Anne Peckham — end curler 

Catch a few stray ends with this and your hair will be curled to perfection. 
Helen Pendergast — tennis racket 

Some day you will rival Helen Wills. 
Lena Purpura — sling to keep your arm in. 

An excuse for missing gym. 
Barbara Rathburn — medal 

For your acting ability in the Senior Play. 
Dorothy Readel — permanent wave 

Isn't this your suppressed desire? 
Lucille Reimer — boy doll 

This is just so you'll never lack a dancing partner. 
Veronica Riley — carrot 

A rival for your colorful hair. 
Kathleen Robertson — glasses 

To see the fun that's going on all about you. 
Edna Rambola — finger nail file 

You refuse to buy one so we thought we'd give you one. 
Margaret Ryan — contract to model at I. J. FOX 
This is because of the fine work for the NYA. 
Josephine Sawkiewich — baseball 

"Go- (re) and (Sawk) this one Joe." 
Elizabeth Schroeder — cupie doll 

Look at this and remember that you are 'Cute.' 
Margaret Sheehan — angel 

May your future be as virtuous as your past. 
Nellie Smelstor — Doctor Lyon's toothpowder. 

To preserve that charming smile. 
Helen Smith — marriage license 

May you 'Be Prepared.' 
Natalie Smith — ticket to Arizona 

We hear you enjoyed the last one. 
Rose Smith — brown eyed susan 

These are like your eyes, Rose. 
Stasia Smith — megaphone 

Hark! What is that musical sound we hear? 
Meeri Sorjanen — pigtails 

Reminder of days gone by. 



Alma Spearwater — dictionary 

To help you conquer the English language. (Remember the Senior Play?) 
Veronica Tareila — cigar 

Try this to stop your rapid growth. 
Rita Tarpey — collar buttons 

Sleep on these every night to keep those dimples. 
Martha Taylor — song the name of it "Where's Elmer." 

Need more be said? 
Albina Thompson — dancing slippers 

You go so often, these might come in handy. 
Nellie Venskus — pass to Finn Hall 

We hear you are up there all the time. 
Phyllis Wallace — book of songs 

Try these on your guitar. 
Virginia Waselunas — stilts 

We all can't be '6'. 
Dorothy Whedon — shaip pencil 

A good secretary always has one. 
Stasia Wilkes — cocomalt 

This will add those desired pounds. 
Helen Wytones — Pass to Dedham Theatre 

You have one already but this will do when it runs out. 

Donald Alden — a pole 

To help you better your record on the high jump. 
Chester Ambruskevich — sox 

You can have that "sox appeal" now. 
Naimi Bader — a cup 

For an all around athlete. 
George Bailey — tap shoes 

So you can tap to stardom. 
Terrence Barrett — toy auto 

Add this to your list, Terry. 
Charles Bartkewicz — a job with Ringling Bros. 

All circuses have a "Barker". 
Leo Bazzy — horn 

Figure it our for yourself, Leo. 
Bernard Bergman — package of razors 

To keep that beard trim. 
Irving Berkland — step ladder 

Come down to earth "Sheik". 
Alexander Blazis — an airplane 

Can you pilot this Alex? 
Joseph Bonica — a noise-maker 

Make known your presence, Joe. 
Robert Bothwell — badge 

All the "sparks" wear one. 
David Boyden — a fire cracker 

So you can see the "Flash". 
John Breen — a scout badge 

You always were a good scout. 
Robert Breen — a book on "How to Put on Weight" 

Take heed Bob. 
George Butler — red ink 

Just so you'll know what it looks like. 
Fred Carlson — a horn 

Blow this Fred so we'll know you're here. 



James Connolly — adhesive tape 

Put this over your mouth, Jimmy. 
Thomas Conroy — bottle of moxie 

To prolong your everlasting characteristic. 
Joseph Conroy — peroxide 

There's too many red-heads in our class, Joe. 
William Coughlin — medal 

For your ability to get along so well with your sister. 
David Curran — a ring 

So youTl know what they look like. 
John Curran — a megaphone 

Speak through this, John. 
John D'Espinosa — a new truck 

So you and Murphy can go into business. 
Edward Doherty — a muffler 

To keep you quiet, Ed. 
James Donovan — a pad of paper 

To keep a list of all your girls. 
John Donovan — alarm clock 

This will be useful to you, "Sleepy". 
John Dower — package of crayons 

Draw us a picture, John. 
Philip Ekholm — a star 

This is what you are in basketball. 
George Elias — piece of chalk 

"Chalk up," George. 
Patrick Flaherty — a beard 

This is what yours will look like soon. 
Thomas Flood — a record 

To record your queer laugh. 
John Foley — a brief case 

To carry all those books home. 
Channing Foss — book on "How to Propose" 

Refer to this when you finally succumb to love. 
Brownie Greene — reducing tablets 

Come down to normal size, Brownie. 
Uuno Hallman — script 

Learn this Uuno, we're sure you're capable. 
Roy Hansen — Coca Cola glass 

Fill 'er up, Roy. 
Lawrence Hayes — boy scout manual 

Keep this with you always. 
Richard Hollister — a scholastic magazine 

Remember to read "Boy Dates Girl". 
Howard Horton — a bus 

So you can cart around the bang. 
Heimo Hyora — rouge 

Put this on Heimo, then we won't know when you're blushing. 
Theodore Hyora — chair 

Rest your weary bones Theodore. 
David Hyyti — a police badge 

Now make believe you're in a cruising car. 
Avard Johnson — vanishing cream 

Put this on your feet Avard. 
Berger Johnson — cleats for your shoes 

So we'll know when you're around. 



Robert Johnson — violet 

Behold the shrinking violet. 
Russell Johnson — dynamite 

Light this off to see if it stirs you. 
James Keady — a tandem bike 

Take your wife on your telegram deliveries. 
John Kelly — a piece of brass 

This symbolizes your outstanding characteristic. 
Vincent Kudirka — a leave of absence 

So you can make those trips to the movies oftener. 
Augustus Lanier — a bed 

Bring it down to the alleys so you can sleep there. 
John Lanzoni — tooth paste 

Give us that Pepsodent smile John. 
Martin Lydon — a soap box 

Preach on this Mike. 
Francis Macaulay — a list of under class girls 

Here's a compiled list, Mac. 
Harold Mattson — a True Romance magazine 

Learn how to be a Casanova, "Nooky". 
Raymond McKale — a "Buddha" 

How did you ever get this name? 
Clifford McLatchey — a piece of rope 

So you can be tied down, then you won't get in "Dutch". 
Michael Mike— a middle, "Mike". 
Rocco Molinari — inches 

If you had these, you'd make a good basketball star. 
Edmund Mulvehill — an Esquire magazine 

Look in this Ed to see if you resemble any of the models. 
Dennis Murphy — a bike 

To help to make frequent visits to Westwood. 
Leo Murphy — bus ticket 

So that you may make frequent visits up town. 
James Murphy — a doll 

So you'll have one with you always. 
Harvey JN utter — record 

This one can be broken easily. 
Michael O'Brien — a pair of glasses 

The eyes you have now don't lake to books. 
Raymond O'Brien — hand cuffs 

Now you can't talk sign language, "Beans". 
Frederick O'Dea — a "U" card 

You never saw one oi these Fred. ( ? ) 
James E. O'Donnell — 16 marbles 

Rack 'em up, Jimmy. 

Joseph O'Laughlin — a pillow 

Rest your tired head on this, Joe. 

John O'Malley — a pass to your favorite theatre 

You know which one we mean, John. 
Thomas O'Toole — a gravel pit 

So you will follow the steps of your namesake. 
Joseph Palleiko — 5 hours 

Now it's our turn to give them to you. 
Edward Paalucci — Slickum 

To keep those locks in place. 



Philip Pendercast — a date book 

Come on "Phil" this up. 
Elmer Pike — pay check 

Will a 104 Nichols (nickels) do? 
Benjamin Polovitch — 8 ball 

Come out from behind this, Bennie. 
Francis Quann — a blue ribbon 

For your ability as a class worker. 
Billy Basimovich — a circus contract 

You will make a good "strong man". 
Joseph Biley — another tie 

Add this to your collection, Joe. 
Elmer Bintala — a sailor's cap 

To wear on the Nantucket. 
Avard BoBBLEE — motorcycle 

To go with your pants. 
Seelem Saarinen — Tastyeast 

This may give you pep. 
Adam Scott — a "Big Apple" 

You certainly can do a job on this. 
Joseph Silvestri — yeast cakes 

Put this under your feet and maybe you'll reach great heights. 
Bussell Spachman — a weight 

Walk on the ground man. 
John Spierdowis — a frankfort 

Do you resemble this, "Hot Dogs"? 
Anthony Stanavich — a cart (double seater) 

It's tough walking to and from school. 
John Stupak — a trinket 

Is there any gold in this, John? 
Oiva Sulonan — a basket 

You certainly made a number of these. 
Andrew Sundgren — a cartoon, "The Timid Soul" 

You're like this, you are seen but usually not heard. 
Toivo Suomi — dumbells 

To work off that excess fat. 
Walter Surette — a sheep 

Come out of the disguise you wolf. 
Francis Tohosky — a camera 

To start you on your career. 
Michael Triventi — hair grower 

All violinists wear long hair, Mike. 
BRONIUS Uzdawinis — Palmer method handwriting book 

Learn to write plainly, Mike. 
William Walker — gray tie 

As long as you have "Gray" you're all set. 
John Wall — brake 

Give this to the girls, John. 
Thomas Wallace — stockings 

We tried to get B(a)y(o»an. 
Frederick Wenstrom — a rule book 

Helps a lot when playing basketball. 
Ernest Weisman — a telephone 

Get acquainted with your classmates. 
John Williamson — mercurochrome 

To touch up that red hair. 



Robert Winslow — "Lazy Bones" 

May this be your theme song. 
George Wood — a marriage license 

This may come in handy. 
Carroll Woods — a letter of introduction to the President 

We hope you fill his shoes some day. 
Anthony Wozniak — "Fuller Brushes" 

You'll make a good salesman, Gus. 
John Ziergiebel — a box 

Give your shoes a rest, John. 



"AN INCIDENT IN THE NIGHT" 

A tall shadowy figure leaned against the stone of a darkened doorway. The 
moonlight lent little light to the scene. An occasional carriage rattled past. The 
stacatto sound of the horse's hoofs could be heard on the cobblestone street. The 
watcher in the doorway listened with anticipation as each carriage approached. As 
each passed along its way without stopping, the young man sighed, and patiently 
resumed his vigil. After some time had elapsed, a carriage similar to the rest drew 
near. As it reached the doorway it slowed and stopped. A person in the carriage 
drew aside the curtain and spoke to the figure in the doorway. He stepped from 
his hiding place, opened the carriage door and disappeared within. 

The carriage resumed its journey. The man spoke. "Ah, my dear, you are 
late. I thought you had perhaps forgotten your promise to me." 

The other figure spoke. "I offer my sincerest apology for causing you any 
discomfort; but I was detained by officials on my way to you. I grieve to say that 
there was a delay before I could resume my journey." 

The voice was that of a young woman. Had there been sufficient light, one 
would have observed that she was very beautiful. 

"Margarette! You did not disclose your identity or mission to the fools!" 

"Oh, you doubt my sincerity — my promise to you? — No. They learned nothing 
and were obliged to let me pass. But now, tell me. When will the ship sail that 
takes you away from me and this land of unhappiness and injustice — where those 
who write the truth are condemned; and forced to flee?" 

The man answered. "The ship sails when I step aboard. With the tide and 
winds with us, I will be well out to sea before sunrise." 

The carriage drew up to a wharf. The rigging and sails of a ship that was 
pulling against the mooring lines, could be seen indistinctly against the sky. The 
water lapped against the timbers. The air was tangy with the salty sea smell. 

The two figures alighted to the ground and clung together a moment. The 
woman spoke sadly. 

"Would that I could but go with you. The days will be lonely and endless, until 
you send for me to come to you in America, — the land that will be our land." 

They spoke in subdued voices a while longer. The man clasped his sweetheart 
in his arms once more, looked a long moment into her beautiful eyes, left her, and 
boarded the ship. Commands were called in the night air. The anchor chain 
rattled and the ship drew slowly away from the wharf. It moved away in the night 
and at last disappeared in the darkness. The girl stood alone on the wharf, watch- 
ing and listening in the gloom. She smiled sadly and spoke the name of the man 
who had gone. 

At last she turned and entered the carriage. Down the cobblestone street the 
little carriage rattled and the stacatto beats of the horse's hoofs rang out in the thin 
night air. The water lapped against the timbers. The air was tangy with the 
salty sea smell. 

BARBARA RATHBUN '38. 




lie Eml 



CRESCENT CALENDAR 

September 

The long trail begins. 
Traffic Squad on duty. 

Sophs awed by Seniors. 

Football squad called out. 
October 

Spirited election gets underway. 

School constitution proposed. 

Carrol Woods elected Senior president. 

Sophomore Party — for Sophs only. 

Debaters elect officers. 

Football rally — the bleachers ring. 

Franny Quann becomes Quest Club head. 
November 

School constitution downed. 

Football Dance — biggest social success ever. 

Football team ends successful season unsuccessfully at Dedham — nuff said. 

Thanksgiving and Turkey. 
December 

Junior Party — a success. 

Year Book launched — name unknown. 

Sophs' Yuletide play. 

Annual Quest Club Party for kiddies. 

Mr. Fairbanks portrays St. Nick. 

Xmas vacation and more turkey. 

We ring out the old. 
January 

We ring in the new. 

Basketball candidates report. 

Junior Prom — good time had by all. 

Basketball team wins first till. 

Senior Play tryouts begin. 
February — The Month of Great Men 

Senior Play rehearsals going full blast. 

Yearbook Staff deluged with work. 

Rifle Squad a topnotch outfit. 

Special portrait offered for Yearbook Name Contest award. 
March 

In like a lion. 

St. Patrick's Day— All's well. 

Yearbook entitled The Crescent — Helen Cleary wins. 

Spring officially begins. 

Out like a lamb. 
April 

Chamber of Commerce essays. 

Mid-Seniors learn their fate. 

Outdoor track, tennis, and baseball launched. 

Group pictures taken — hair slicked and faces shining. 

Easter recess. 
May 

Seniors rehearse for graduation. 

Swing 'n' Sway at the Senior Prom. 

"Nightfall in Granada" echoes throughout the corridors. 
June 

Class Day — everybody happy? 

Senior Banquet — Speeches, eats, and prelude to graduation. 

Graduation — The Night of Nights. 



■ GRANDMA GOODHEART 

Grandma Goodheart was loved by all the people of Mountain Village. When- 
ever anyone was in trouble or was ill, it was she who went to them immediately. By 
confiding in her, their worries were gone, for she always knew some solution to 
their problems. By taking the medicines she prepared, their aches and pains dis- 
appeared. 

She lived all by herself in a neat, cozy little cottage. The flowers around it 
appreciated their mistress' loving care and redoubled their efforts to display the 
best of blossoms. On her hearth a kettle boiled continuously to make a cup of tea 
for anyone who came. Grandma loved nothing better than a chat with a neighbor. 

One day she received a letter from her grandson. He had made a fortune in 
the West and was coming back to visit the little old lady he loved so well. Upon 
reading this news, Grandma started to make the preparations for the day of his 
arrival. Everything must be perfect, she thought. How she enjoyed anticipating 
the event! 

At last he came. What a fine young man he was! For nearly a month he 
stayed with her. All the time he watched her in her simple life. He smiled at her 
home remedies, at her kind advice. He had not told her, but he planned to take 
her with him to live in New York. 

A day or so before he was going to leave, he proudly disclosed his secret to 
Grandma. He vividly painted the broad avenues, the tall skyscrapers, the huge 
stores, the luxurious apartments and hotels. He described the modern conveniences, 
many of which she had never seen. She listened intently, her face filled with rap- 
ture. Wait until she told the neighbors about her good fortune! 

Once in New York, her grandson set out to show her the whole city. Gaily they 
went, seeing everything from museums to night clubs. At first Grandma thought 
she had never had such a good time in her life. She was enchanted by the gleaming 
white kitchen in their spacious apartment. Everything was so efficient and orderly. 
But Grandma couldn't go into the kitchen without displeasing the cook — and her 
grandson. He said his grandmother shouldn't go near the kitchen. She didn't need 
to now. Always, things were done for her. The situation went from bad to worse. 
She felt herself growing dissatisfied and unhappy. 

One evening when she was alone, she packed her little bag and, leaving a note to 
explain her absence, slipped away. Her grandson found it on coming in. It read: 

"Forgive me for going. I have enjoyed it all. Lately I have realized, however, 
that the place for me is in Mountain Village. The people there need me and I enjoy 
helping them. I think you will understand." 

Grandma. 

"Yes," said he, after a minute's thought, "she's right." 

BARBARA NICHOLS '38. 



MEMORIES 

We wear a reminiscent smile 

And feel that it was well worth while. 

The days we spent upon the hill 

In search of knowledge haunt us still. 

And if o'er all the world we roam, 

When aged, we'll remember home 

And stately etched against the sky, 

That grand old school called Norwood High. 

IRVING BERKLAND '38. 



JOHN BROOKS IN NEW YORK CITY 

It seemed to John Brooks that ages had passed since he had entered New York 
City in an over-crowded bus. One glance was enough to recognize the fact that he 
was no city dweller. His short, sturdy, body, clothed in a plain, brown suit, and 
his tanned features proclaimed him to be a tiller of the soil. Despite his parents 
pleadings, John Brooks had left his farm so that he might try his luck in the city. 

Now he was turning his back upon an office door on which a card had been 
tacked— "No Employment Needed." It had been like this for the past two weeks. 
He left the building in a bewildered state of mind with only fifty cents in his pocket. 
Fifty cents. Not even enough to pay for his return to his farm. His spirits were 
low for he now realized that the city was not the place for him. How was he going 
to pay his landlady? How was he going to be able to secure food? His thoughts 
were interrupted by a gust of cold wind which made him button his overcoat up to 
his chin. With the wind came a flurry of tiny snow-flakes which increased in size 
and volume as he walked along. At first John Brooks paid no heed to the fluttering 
flakes of snow, but all at once he stopped. Here was a job at last — that, of shovelling 
snow. 

For two days John Brooks shoveled snow for the city of New York. On the 
evening of the third day a fast-moving, express train carried John Brooks toward 
his destination, his farm in the open country. 

ANDREW SUNDGREN '38. 



"THE ENCHANTED SPOT" 
I 

There is a place in the wildwood, 
Where I love to go each day, 
To sit among the wild flowers, 
And watch the birds at play. 

II 
Beyond the oak a stream is seen, 
Bubbling and laughing along its way, 
While the crickets, birds, bees and all, 
Start their orchestra for the day. 

Ill 

As I lie there neath the leafy tree, 
And smell the perfumed air, 
The wind that sings a lullaby 
Seems to banish my every care. 

IV 
Then when homeward I must go 
To leave a place so fine, 
I thank God for the things He's done 
To satisfy mankind. 

V 
No matter how rich or poor we be, 
The singing birds, the sturdy tree, 
The babbling brook, the beautiful bee, 
God hath sent them all for us to see. 

By KATHLEEN ROBERTSON 



Going Shopping? 

Pa I /• o // iz e 
// r 

A d v e r I i :c e r s 



A LESSON IN 



RECIPROCITY 



"Home" is a beloved word ... a word that, to older people, encompasses the nostalgic 
memories of childhood: the old gang, end the old familiar scenes . . . the old swimming 
place, the never-to-be-forgotten fraternity of high school days. Norwood is your home 
. . . some future day its destinies may even be guided by your own hands. Remember, 
now, that its existence is largely due to the merchants and business enterprises located 
within it . . . and they in turn only exist in-so-far as you patronize them. Just as your 
year book is financially helped by the merchants who buy advertising space in 
it . . . just so is the merchant helped by your return patronage. Reciprocity is only 
another way of saying help those who help you. Buy your graduating needs in Norwood. 
We carry graduating clothing of distinction - - - oxford or blue suits for young men 
from $19.75 to $29.00 and graduation dresses for young ladies from $3.95 to $12.95. 

ORENT BROTHERS 



JOHNSON MOTOR SALES 



Washington Street 



ISLINGTON - WESTWOOD, MASS. 



Oldsmobile Sales and Service 



Used Cars 

Tel. NOR. 1026 



C0MPL1M E X TS OF 


LEWIS J. DANOVITCH, D. M. D. 


Garner's Pharmacies 


Clear Weave Hosiery 


Prescription Specialists 


Stores, Inc. 


C**=f"F^ 






C^^^J 


Kodak Headquarters 




Photo Supplies - Movie Film 


Largest Hosiery and Lingerie 


Developing and Printing 


Chain In New England 


C^sf^^ 


C^s?^T> 


639 Washington Street 


629A Washington Street 


and 


NORWOOD 


170 Walpole Street 




COMPLIME N TS OF 


PETER FISHER & SON 


—ROSES— 



N. F. STEWART, Opt. D. 



OPTOMETRIST 



See Us For Complete Optical Service 



679A Washington St. 



Tel. Nor. 1388 For Appointment 



REMEMBER 



CARL ROTH'S 



Auto Repairing of 
All Kinds 



12 Johnson Court 



Tel. NOR. 1504 



Compliments of 



NORWOOD 
PHARMACY 



C. LANGLOIS 



WILLIAM T. LOVELL 



D. M. D. 



JACK'S TAXI AND TRAVEL BUREAU 

Greyhound Bus Depot 



NORwood 0022 



GAY FARM 

MILK AND CREAM 

Fresh, Rich, Quality Milk From Our Own Herds of 
State and Federal Tested Cows 

Produced Under Sanitary Conditions With 
Up-To-Date Euipment 

TEL. NORWOOD 1168 95 PROSPECT STREET 



SOCONY GAS STATION 

Super Highway, Route 1 at Dean Street 
COMPLIMENT S F 

FRED QUATTRUCCI 



PRESCRIPTION 
SPECIALISTS 
SINCE 1896 

A Registered 
Pharmacist 
Always In 
Attendance 



Yardley 
Evening in Paris }| 
and Coty 
Toilet 

Requisites 
We are official 

headquarters 

for these fine 

cosinetics 




ACCURACY ASSURED 
_ IN FILLING 

PRESCIHPTHJNS 

IvcryHnig exacty os your Doctor antemJ 
Yod may depend upon (he 

Freshness and Pnrrty oC ,, 
our drags — - 



.n Ti : . •'■..--,«,. i ft. 




Visit Our Fountain for A Refreshing Drink 

Our soda is always 36° F. or lower 

Delicious Ice Cream Sodas & Sundaes 

15c 

Whitman's, Foss and Cynthia Sweets 
Chocolates in 1, 2 or 5 lb. boxes $1.00 up 

Clark's Pharmacy 

The Prescription Store 
Conger Block Tel. 1758 Norwood, Mass. 



VERNE INN 

LUNCHEONS 

Steak — Chicken 
DINNERS 

We Cater to Weddings, 

Anniversaries, Banquets, 

etc. 



JOHN SALMI 



TRUCKING SERVICE 



47 CHAPEL STREET 



complete line of 
graduation cards 
and gifts at 



the alice shop 

711 Washington Street 
NORWOOD 



ENDEAN FARM 

MILK and CREAM 
Raw or Pasteurized 

From the Farm's Own Tuberculin 
and Blood Tested Herd 

Tel. NORwood 1181 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



At Your ttrr<4 




Cliff's Band Box Cleansers 

168 WALPOLE STREET 

All Work Done On Premises 

Tel. NORwood 1668 



NEPONSET VALLEY FARM 

QUALITY ICE CREAM 
Milk — Cream — Butter — Buttermilk 

NORWOOD MASS. 



RICHARD F. PENDERGAST 

INSURANCE 

30 PLEASANT STREET TEL. NORWOOD 0547 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

TOWN SQUARE HARDWARE 
AND SUPPLY CORP. 

599 WASHINGTON ST. NORWOOD, MASS. 



Compliments of 



THE 



OLDE COLONIAL CAFE 



33 Savin Avenue 



NORWOOD MASS. 



( ' MP LI M E NTS OF 



Dr. Thomas H. O'Toole 



Compliments of 



TOWN SQUARE 

ATHLETIC 
ASSOCIATION 



Compliments of 



FIRST NATIONAL 
STORES, Inc. 



FOR 100'.' SERVICE PATRONIZE 

MACKIE'S EXPRESS 

Boston — Norwood — Dedham — Walpole 
THREE TRIPS DAILY — NOON SERVICE 

Main Office 107 Wilson St., Norwood Tel. 0715-M 

Down Town Office 48 Day St. Tel. 0982 



COM PLI M E N T S OF 



FRIEND 



Compliments of 



BALBONI'S 



PACKAGE 



STORE 



856 Washington Street 



BEST WISHES - - CLASS 1938 

Martin J. Foley, '09 

REAL ESTATE 

and 

INSURANCE 



NORTH WALPOLE GREENHOUSE 



POTTED PLANTS AND FLOWERS 



Large Assortment of Glazed Pottery and Vases 



Flowers Telegraphed Anywhere 



Tel. Walpole 



DODGE PLYMOUTH 

New and Used Cars 

TOWN SQUARE MOTORS 

CLEMENT RILEY — Class '24 

Cars Washed, Polished, Lubricated 
SALES SERVICE 



ARTHUR J. FORREST 

PETROLEUM PRODUCTS CO. 

Distributors of 

DELCO 
GENERAL MOTORS PRODUCTS 

and 

ESSO PRODUCTS 
NAHATAN and LENOX ST. TEL. NOR. 1446 



AUTO RENTING and TAXI SERVICE 

WILLIAM C. DONOVAN 

30 PASSENGER WHITE PACKARD LIMOUSINE 

MOTOR COACH WEDDINGS 

PARTIES FUNERALS 



COMPLIMENTS TO THE (LASS OF 1938 

from 

THE NEW STEAM BATH 

Open Friday — 4 P. M. to 12 P. M. 
Saturday — 11 A. M. to 12 P. M. 

JOHN SNOMI — Prop. 
74 CEDAR STREET SOUTH NORWOOD, MASS. 



FORDHAM 

BEAUTY 

SHOP 

Brings the 
nation's newest 
coiffure to the 
Ladies of 
Norwood 

Big Apple . . . 

Now it's a tricky coiffure keeping step with the 
latest tricky dance. It's the coiffure pictured 
here that created a furore at the American Cos- 
meticians' Association Convention at Chicago, 
just a few weeks ago. We'll dance your curls 
into "The Big Apple," or an adaptation that will 
suit your style. 

The Big Apple, Complete, *.'..(MI 

Get your new permanent wave now at 
Fordham's for only 

THREE DOLLARS 

Special Waves up to $10. (Ml 
Shampoo 2,">c Finger Wave 25c-50c Marcel 50c 

FORDHAM BEAUTY SHOP 

in Vernon Street Street Floor Norwood 0292 




"PUT YOUP FEET IN REGAN'S 
HANDS" 



Red Cross 
Shoes 

AAA to C 

Sizes Up To 9 



America's Smartest 
Shoes 

Styled Up To The 
Minute 



c^=r^^ 



Regan's Shoe Corner 



637 Washington St. 



Nor. 0496-J 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



Wayne L a Flamboy, D. M. D. 



SUFFOLK UNIVERSITY 

Co-educational 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Day and evening classes 

Cultural and pre-professional courses 

A. B., B. S. and B. S. in Ed. degrees 



COLLEGE OF JOURNALISM 

Evening classes taught by editors, 
journalists and advertising men 
B. S. in Journalism degree 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Evening classes in Accounting, 

Banking, Finance and Business Management 

B. S. in Business Administration degree 



SUFFOLK LAW SCHOOL 

Day and evening Divisions 

Pre-legal courses for high school graduates 

LL. B. degree, prepares for law practice 



GRADUATE SCHOOL OF LAW 

Evening classes 
LL. M. degree 



Tuition in all departments $160 a year 

• • • 

For catalogues and information: 
Call: CAPitol 0555 (or) Write to: 

SUFFOLK UNIVERSITY 

20 Derne Street 
BOSTON MASSACHUSETTS 



MAY HERZOG - MILLINERY 


10 GUILD STREET 


"SMART HATS AS YOU LIKE IT" 


SUEDE CREPE HOSIERY 


DAINTY UNDERTHINGS 


Beauty Culture by Trained 
Experts 


Beaver Coal & Oil Co. 


• • 

YVONNE'S 


OftOMATtC 

^* HEATING *V/ 


BEAUTY PARLOR 


SALES Cr SERVICE 


HAIR DRESSERS 


"A Complete Fuel Service" 


• • 


• • 


9 Eastern Avenue 


BROADWAY NORWOOD 


DEDHAM MASS. 


Tel. NORwood 0137 


Tel. DEDham 1636 




E. E. DROUIN 


JEWELER 


Watch Repairing Also Clock and Jewelery 
Expert Workmanship Repairing 


Guaranteed And Engraving of All Kinds 
710 WASHINGTON STREET NORWOOD, MASS. 



C M PLIMENTS OF 



John V. Whelan, D. M, D. 



SANBORN BLOCK 



NORWOOD, MASS. 



The best in — 
Electrical Merchandise 

G. E. REFRIGERATORS 

EASY WASHERS 

IRONRITE IRONERS 

Leading Makes of Small 
Appliances 

Largest Lighting Fixture Display 
In Norfolk County 

C^5f>^ 

DE ROMA BROS. 

ELECTRIC SHOP 

666 Washington St. Norwood 



MARY HARTIGAN 



Junction Route 1A & 128 



DEDHAM 



MASS. 



Luncheon & Dinner 
Specials 



ICE CREAM 
SANDWICHES 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



WILLIAM J. GILOOLY 



Norwood Lumber Co., Inc. 



EVERYTHING FOB THE BUILDER" 



ROCKWOOL INSULATION 

HOMASOTE — CELOTEX 

PLYWOOD 

DOORS — WINDOWS 

MILLWORK SPECIALTIES 

EAST HOYLE STREET TEL. NORWOOD 0244 



u 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

WHITEY" OELSCHLAGEL 



COMPLIMENT S F 

Dr. Joseph F. Foley 



JEN'S BEAUTY SHOPPE 



Specializing In Permanents 



All Work Done in the Line of 
Beautv Culture 



8 ST. JAMES AVE. 



TEL. NORWOOD 1594 



THE MODERN DAIRY 



MILK and CREAM 



Quality Dairy Products 



TEL. NORWOOD 0084-W 



350 LENOX STREET 



PIONEER FARM 

AND 


DREYFUS & WHITE 


GREENHOUSES 


WHOLESALE 


Fisher Street Walpole 


FRUITS & VEGETABLES 


E. F. ELLIS, Prop. 


• • 


* 




The Finest in Flowers 


629 - 715 Washington Street 


and 


NORWOOD MASS. 


Vegetables 
Grown Under Glass 


Tel. NDR. 1526 - 0482 


Vega Baking Co., Inc. 

Route 1 Norwood, Mass. 


BEST WISHES 
from the makers of 


Tel. NOR. 0567 


Simpson Spring 


* 


Beverages 


For Delicious Full Course 


SOUTH EASTON MASS. 


Dinners 
Try Vega's 


* 


SWEDISH PASTRY 


Famous for Quality, Purity 


and 


and Flavor 


AMERICAN DISHES 


Since 1878 



METROPOLITAN LIFE INSURANCE 



COMPLIMENTS OF DISTRICT AGENTS 



L. T. BRACKEN 
M. J. MURPHY 
JAS. WEST 



H. P. 2531-J 

NOR. 1275-W 

NOR. 1073 



Orders Put Up To Take Out 

SHANGHAI 



Chinese-American Restaurant 



Open 11 A. M. to 1 A. M. 



Private Dining Room for Parties 



506 Washington Street 
NORWOOD MASS. 

Tel. NORwood 0454 



Compliments of 



THE NORWOOD 
WOMEN'S SHOP 

631 Washington Street 
NORWOOD MASS. 



Tel. NORwood 0236 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

Dr. Timothy J. Curtin 

DENTIST 
34 HOYLE STREET NORWOOD 

Tel. NORwood 0378-W 



Taylor Block— Room 16 Cor. Washington & Guild Sts. 

Tel. NORwood 0062 

ONYX BEAUTY SALON 

Gabrieleen and Zolog Permanents A Specialty 
Closed Wednesday Afternoon 



W. E. MACE 



CHOICE LINE OF GROCERIES 



345 PROSPECT STREET 



NORWOOD 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



NORWOOD FURNITURE CO. 



Furlong's Cloverleaf Candies & Ice Cream 

NORWOOD THEATRE BUILDING 



TEL. NORWOOD 1293 



VICTORIA REST HAVEN 

A NURSING HOME OF DISTINCTION 

for invalids, elderly people and chronic cases 

ASK FOR BOOKLET 

Call 

LAURA A. MacKENNEY 

137 NICHOLS STREET NORWOOD 

Tel. NORwood 0858 



Compliments of 



West St. Handy Store 



Choice Line of 
GROCERIES and TOBACCOS 



Open Sundays 



Tel. NORwood 1844 



FREE DELIVERY 



Walpole St. Market 

134 Walpole Street 



HEAVY WESTERN BEEF 



GROCERIES 



FISH 



FRUITS VEGETABLES 



Tel. NORwood 1481 



FREE DELIVERY 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

CUMMING'S CO. 

686 WASHINGTON STREET NORWOOD 



DRESSES 



STYLE 



COATS — 

For 
QUALITY 



MILLINERY 



VALUE 



Telephone NORwood 0882 

THE ALICE BEAUTY PARLOR 

681 Washington Street Sanborn Block, Room 21 

NORWOOD MASSACHUSETTS 

Permanent Waving, Hair Cutting, Marcelling, Finger Waving, 

Manicuring 

Specialists in All Branches of Beauty Culture 

THE FAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

52 Beacon Street Boston, Massachusetts 

One-year and two-year courses in Academic and Secretarial Science offering, 
in addition to the conventional business courses, training in the development 
of attractive and efficient business personality. The environment is homelike 
and highly cultural. Catalog. 

M. IRENE FAY 

Director and Vocational Adviser 

A GOOD SALARY 

Secured by girls completing courses on Comptometers, Electric Burroughs 
Calculators, Elliott Fisher Billing, Electric Monroe Machines, Ediphones and 
Dictaphones, Typewriting. Day and evening. Enroll any Monday. Diplomas 
and free placement for graduates. Positions have been obtained for all our 
graduates to date. 25th year. 

Higgins Commercial Machine School 

234 BOYLSTON STREET 

"The School of Positions" 
Established 1912 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

R. H. Bruce, V. M. D. 

NORWOOD VETERINARY HOSPITAL 

NORWOOD MASS. 



♦ ♦ 



Bushway- Whiting Ice Cream 

Served in the 
Norwood High School Cafeteria 

♦ ♦ 



♦ ♦ 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



C. I. Davis and Son 



♦ ♦ 



New \ 

ENGlANDj 

^ Coke I 



For Warm, Healthy Homes 

We 
Recommend and Guarantee 

NEW ENGLAND COKE 



Our best wishes to 

every member of the 

Graduating Class 

For Success, Happiness and Prosperity 



JOHN A. WHITTEMORE'S 

SONS, INC. 

HAROLD L. ALDEN, President 
269 LENOX STREET 710 WASHINGTON STREET 



L. G. BALFOUR COMPANY 

ATTLEBORO MASSACHUSETTS 

Leaders in the Manufacture of 

CLASS RINGS AND PINS 

COMMENCEMENT ANNOUNCEMENTS 

DIPLOMAS 
CUPS — MEDALS — TROPHIES 

Jeweler to the Senior Class of 
Norwood Senior High School 

Representative 

EUGENE MANCHESTER 

L. G. BALFOUR CO. 

ATTLEBORO MASS. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

Dr. Joseph M. Hirch 

DENTIST 



i i 



A FRIEND" 



C. H. WOODS, N. H. S. '08 



J. V. FITZGERALD, N. H. S. '14 



Carrol H. Woods Insurance Agency 

DEPENDABLE INSURANCE 
OF ALL KINDS 

NORWOOD SQUARE 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



J. C. LANDRY 



CO MP LIME N TS OF 

Dr. A, J, Kizelewicz 

CHIROPODIST PODIATRIST 



C. D. MAZZOLA C. W. MAZZOLA 

MONUMENTS — WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

NORWOOD MONUMENTAL WORKS 

MAZZOLA'S MEMORIALS H 

Washington and Chapel Streets 
TEL. NORWOOD 1735 NORWOOD, MASS. 



NORWOOD FREE PRESS 



RADIO SALES & SERVICE 
Philco — RCA — Zenith 

All of the Leading Makes 

Stewart Warner Refrigerators 

All service work completed at our own shop — not sub-contracted 

BIG TRADE INS EASY TERMS 

NORWOOD RADIO COMPANY 

R. A. NORTON 
49 DAY STREET NORWOOD 1101 



Quick • 




Efficient • 


Compliments of 


Economical • 


THOMAS F. HOLMAN 


SERVICE 






CATERER 


• • 


* 


NORWOOD GAS 


Tel. NORwood 0512 


COMPANY 


NORWOOD MASS. 


OUTSTANDING SERVICE 




FOR PAST THIRTY YEARS 
* 


BARRY the FLORIST 


Cleaning — Pressing 


Plants — Cut Flowers 


* 
LADIES - MEN'S SUITS 


Wedding — Funeral Designs 


OUR SPECIALTY 




* 


• • 


ADRIAN PAOLUCCI 


5331/2 Washington Street 


TAILOR 


NORWOOD MASS. 


SUCCESSOR TO CARL ANDERSON 


Tel. NORwood 0977-W 


714 Washington Street 




Tel. NORwood 0032-R 







* 


Russell Pharmacy, 




Inc. 


Compliments of 


W. E. RUSSELL, Reg. Ph. G. 


Gertrude's Pastry 


• • 


Shoppe 


609 Washington Street 




NORWOOD MASS. 






* 


Compliments of 


* 


The Ernest May 


Compliments of 


Funeral Service 


Dr. D. J. Murphy 


• • 






DENTIST 


81 Nichols St. Tel. Nor. 1509 




NORWOOD MASS. 






* 



JAMES J. CURRAN 



Attorney at Law 



18-19 Bigelow Bldg. 



Norwood, Mass. Norwood 1493 



635 Tremont Bldg. 
Boston Capitol 2875 



Compliments of 

BROOKS 

Prescription Pharmacy 

850 Washington Street 

NORWOOD MASS. 

Phone NORwood 1647 

EDWARD J. GORDON, Reg. Ph., Prop. 

Eastman Kodak Agency 

Cameras Films 

Developing Material 

* 

For Gifts 

APOLLO CHOCOLATES 

* 

Evening in Paris and Coty 
Compacts, Perfume Sets, etc. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



JOHN M. LINDBLOM 



CONTRACTOR 





°^ 



SAND 

COLUMBO 






^ 



*> 



^ 



WASHED SAND and GRAVEL 



LOAM and FILLING MATERIALS 



CRUSHED STONE— BINDING GRAVEL 
Fine Materials for Driveways 



DAILY OUTPUT ALL SEASONS 



1215 EAST STREET DEDHAM, MASS. 

Tel. DEDham 0987 











THE 
PLIMPTON PRESS 




Composition Electrotyping 
Press Work Binding 








WALTER H. BROWN 

SHEET METAL WORK 

Welding — Radiator Repairing — Automobile Specialties 

Dents Removed from Auto Bodies and Fenders 

8 VERNON ST., NORWOOD TEL. NORWOOD 0720 


See and Drive the 
1938 FORD and LINCOLN ZEPHYR 

85 H. P. 60 H. P. Lincoln Zephyr V-12 
Economical Utmost Economy 16 to 18 Miles per gal. 
Maximum Good Performance Comfort, Economy 
Performance Styling 
Reconditioned REPAIRING 

used cars Sales Service lubrication 

& TRUCKS MAINTENANCE 
See them— Drive them PARTS 

J. A. MORAN, Inc. 

86 BROADWAY Telephone 1480 NORWOOD 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

T. F. RILEY 

47 DAY STREET TEL. NORWOOD 0714 

PLUMBING — HEATING — REFRIGERATION 

and Full Line of Sherwin Williams Paints 



For All the Norwood News the Day It Happens 

READ THE DAILY MESSENGER 



It Costs Two Cents and It's Worth It 



ASSOCIATED PRESS MEMBER 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



CAVALIERS SWING BAND 



NORWOOD 



TEL. NORWOOD 1410-R 



FRANK A. MORRILL, Pres. 



CARROLL P. NEAD, Treas. 



FRANK A. MORRILL, Inc. 

GENERAL INSURANCE 



Bigelow Block 

NORWOOD 



698 Washington Street 
MASS. 



• • 


NORWOOD 
TAXI 




Phone 


Compliments of 


0400 


LEWIS RESTAURANT 


DAY and NIGHT SERVICE 


95 Central Street 


• • 


NORWOOD MASS. 


Packard Limousines 
For Funerals, 




Weddings, 


• • 


etc. 




pURRAN QANSONE 
V; OURTESY O ERVICE 


♦ ♦ 4 


♦ ♦ ♦ 


Compliments of 


Compliments of 


Dr. Arthur S. Hartwell 


Dr. V. A. Pelletier 


♦ ♦ ♦ 


♦ ♦ ♦ 



PERRY J. CROUSE 



REAL ESTATE 



WESTWOOD 



TEL. DEDHAM 1008 



Baker's 
Dress Goods Shop 



♦ ♦ ♦ 



Silks - Cottons - Woolens 

Infants' and Children's Wear 

Underwear 



♦ ♦ ♦ 



NORwood 0948-W 



Compliments of 



Norwood Hardware 
and Supply Co., Inc. 



NORWOOD THEATRE 

"THE SHOWPLACE OF NORFOLK COUNTY" 

Tel. NORwood 1200 

Matinee Daily at 2:00 

Evenings Continuous from 6:30 

Sundays Continuous from 4:45 

Program Changes Sunday and Thursday 



Compliments of 

BIRD & SON inc 

EAST WALPOLE, MASS. 
NEW YORK — CHICAGO — SHREVEPORT, LA. 

manufacturers 

BIRD 

Building and Roofing 
Products 



Floor Coverings 



Boxes - Cartons - Special Papers 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



The Holliston Mills, Inc. 



NORWOOD MASS. 



Manufacturers of Bookbinding Fabrics 



T. 0. Metcalf Company 



BOSTON MASS. 




COMPLIMENTS 



WINSLOW BROS. & 
SMITH CO. 



Sheepskin Tanners Since 1776 



NORWOOD 



MASSACHUSETTS 



United Cooperative 


Thrift Shoe Store 


Society of Norwood 


709 Washington Street 


♦ ♦ ♦ 


NORWOOD MASS. 


MEATS— GROCERIES 


♦ ♦ ♦ 


PROVISIONS — MILK 


Whether for Sport. Dress or 


47 Savin Avenue 


Formal, Let Our Footwear 




Give You A Good 


Phone NORwood 0438 


Start In Life 


♦ ♦ ♦ 


♦ ♦ ♦ 
Compliments of 


Compliments of 




NORWOOD DAIRY 


JOSEPH J. PRAINO 


LUNCH 


PLUMBING & HEATING 
Tel. NORwood 1059 


♦ ♦ ♦ 






♦ ♦ ♦ 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

THE NORWOOD DAIRY 



W. E. STUART, Supt. 



DUNN'S STAND 

ROUTE 1 SHARON 

Wishes to congratulate the Class of 38 and 

to thank our many friends of Norwood High 

School for their past patronage 



lOIIINIBIH 




Established 1926 



THE GILLIS BUSINESS SCHOOL 



COMPTOMETER 

BOOKKEEPING 

ACCOUNTING 



INDIVIDUAL INSTRUCTION 

EDIPHONE 
PUBLIC SPEAKING 
BUSINESS LAW 
BUSINESS ENGLISH 



TYPEWRITING 
MIMEOGRAPH 
SHORTHAND 



S P E E D W R I T 1 N G 

The Practical Shorthand Written With A, B, Os 

Easy To Learn, To Write and Read 

DAY AND EVENING CLASSES 

30 WALPOLE STREET NORWOOD 0844 




BEAUTY CULTURE 

The Ideal Profession 

WILFRED 

The Ideal School 

An entire building' is devoted to spacious 
classrooms and lecture halls for prac- 
tical trainirg in every \ hase of Beauty 
Culture 

Wilfied has equipped this unique train- 
ing center with the most complete and 
most modern facilities available. 
Wilfred maintains a staff of capable in- 
structors to supervise your training and 
to give you individual attention during 
your training period. 

And after graduation, we offer a per- 
petual Free Placement Service. 
Modest rates — - easy terms. Day, eve- 
ning classes. 

For comprehensive information, visit us 
or write for illustrated Booklet E7. 




WILFRED ACADEMY 

OF HAIR AND BEAUTY CULTURE 

492 BOYLSTON ST. BOSTON, MASS. KENMORE 7286 



BEFORE YOU BUY -- TRY 
THE GAR FOLKS WON'T DO WITHOUT 



Naiwo-ad feviok Gosyijxanif, 



10-16 COTTAGE STREET 



NORWOOD 



TWENTY-ONE BUICK MODELS 



STARTING AT $1032.00 DELIVERED 



NORTHEASTERN 
UNIVERSITY 

DAY DIVISION 

College of Liberal Art? 

Offers a broad program of college subjects serving as a foundation for the under- 
standing of modern culture, social relations, and technical achievement. The purpose 
of this program is to give the student a liberal and cultural education and a vocational 
competence which fits him to enter some specific type of useful employment. 

College of Business Administration 
Offers a college program with broad and thorough training in the principles of 
business with specialization in ACCOUNTING, BANKING AND FINANCE, or 
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT. Instruction is through lectures, solution of business 
problems, class discussions, motion pictures and talks by business men. 

College of Engineering 
Provides complete college programs in Engineering with professional courses in 
the fields of CIVIL, MECHANICAL, (WITH DIESEL. AERONAUTICAL, AND 
AIR CONDITIONING OPTIONS), ELECTRICAL, CHEMICAL, INDUSTRIAL 
ENGINEERING, and ENGINEERING ADMINISTRATION. Students select, at the 
beginning of the sophomore year, the course in which they intend to specialize. 

Co-operative Plan 
The Co-operative Plan provides for a combination of practical industrial experi- 
ence with classroom instruction. Upperclassmen earn a portion of their school expenses 
and make business contacts which prove valuable in later years. 

Degrees Awarded 
Bachelor of Arts Bachelor of Science 



EVENING DIVISION 

(For Men and Women) 

Providing complete courses of university grade, for high school graduates ivho find it 
necessary to work during t'e day but ivish to study for further advancement. 



School of Business 

Programs in Accounting, Management, 
Law and Business, and in Engineering 
and Business, under instructors actually 
engaged in the fields in which they teach. 

7S ( /< of graduates hold executive posi- 
tions in business. Preparation for the 
C. P. A. examinations. School grants 
B. B. A. degree. Individual courses 
available to special students. 



School of Law 

Pre-Legal Department 

Furnishes to high school graduates a 
program of studies equivalent to the two 
years of college work inquired for ad- 
mission to the study of law. 

The School of Law 

Prepares for the bar examination and 
for the practice of law. Case method of 
instruction. LL.B. degree conferred. 



Graduates of Norwood High School may be admitted without examinations if 
grades are satisfactory to the Department of Admissio>is. 

Catalogs or further information sent upon request 

NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



Compliments of 

A FRIEND 


Compliments of 

Reardon 
6 s 

Carducci 


OPEN NIGHTS 
UNTIL 2 A. M. 


PROVIDENCE TURNPIKE 
DEDHAM, MASS. 




1 HOWARD C 

JohnsonO 




Lu 


DINE WITH US 

ncheon At- All Tim 

"Join Us At Johnson's 


es 



THE WARREN KAY VANTINE 

STUDIO 

wishes to take this opportunity to thank the 
students and faculty members of the NOR- 
WOOD HIGH SCHOOL for the courteous 
treatment and co-operation extended to us 
during the academic school year. 
We have enjoyed working with all of you 
and appreciate the confidence which has 
been placed in us. We sincerely hope that 
this year will be the beginning of many more 
years of very pleasant business relationships 
with your school. 



THE WARREN KAY VANTINE 

STUDIO, INC. 

160 BOYLSTON STREET BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 




Kennedy's 

UNDER-GRAD SHOP 



Because ''good taste" constitutes "good dress" and because 
this ideal is reflected in all of our Under-Grad offerings, 
Kennedy's has won a reputation for making ''best dressers" 
of high and prep school men. 



KENNEDY'S 

SUMMER & HAW LEY 




NEW TUXEDOS FOR HIRE 

READ & WHITE 

Ladies' - Men's Formal Clothes 
Rented For All Occasions 



READ & WHITE 



111 SUMMER STREET 
WOOLWORTH BUILDING 



BOSTON 
PROVIDENCE, R. I. 



J-lte K^jtaJLuate 

May the lessons you've learned 
And the honors you've earned 

Bring you deep satisfaction today, 
And may each busy year 

Hold good fortune and cheer 

As you hopefully journey 

life's way. 

HAWTHORNE 



I 




Our Part in Preserving 

School day Memories 

Each year we are called upon to produce engravings for more and more year Looks. 
Large or small, we are deeply concerned about the appearance of every book. Each 
engraving receives individual treatment from beginning to end assuring faithful and 
uniform reproductions. Our Engravings Were Used in This Booh 

BACK BAy ELECTROTYPE # ENGRAVING CO. 

Art + Photo Engraving +■ Wax Engraving 
Electrotypes -f- Stereotypes +■ Mats 

172 COLUMBUS AVE., BOSTON, MASS. 



Congratulations 

To Your Year Book Staff 
and to Your Faculty Advisor 



— for producing an outstanding yearbook. From 
many years of experience in printing school and 
college annuals, we know that such a yearbook 
as yours requires many long hours of planning 
and an infinite amount of attention to details. 
We are happy to have had a part in producing 
the CRESCENT. 



YEAR BOOKS 
SHOW CARDS 
NEWSPAPERS 



CATALOGUES 
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